History of Pre and Perinatal (PPN) Parent Education: A literature review.

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Abstract

This literature review focuses on the history of pre- and perinatal (PPN) parenting education. The topic constituted one area examined to inform four studies included in a PhD program of research that investigated factors to consider when designing, developing, and delivering PPN parenting programs for the 21st century. This article discusses five topics that include: (a) an historical overview of PPN education in general; (b) programs and interventions that target mothers-only; (c) programs and interventions that target fathers-only; (d) programs and interventions that target couples during the transition to parenthood; and (e) opportunities for developing needs-based programs for future parents that can be empirically measured for effectiveness.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-219
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health
Volume32
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

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title = "History of Pre and Perinatal (PPN) Parent Education: A literature review.",
abstract = "This literature review focuses on the history of pre- and perinatal (PPN) parenting education. The topic constituted one area examined to inform four studies included in a PhD program of research that investigated factors to consider when designing, developing, and delivering PPN parenting programs for the 21st century. This article discusses five topics that include: (a) an historical overview of PPN education in general; (b) programs and interventions that target mothers-only; (c) programs and interventions that target fathers-only; (d) programs and interventions that target couples during the transition to parenthood; and (e) opportunities for developing needs-based programs for future parents that can be empirically measured for effectiveness.",
author = "McKee, {Christine L.} and Stapleton, {Peta B.} and Pidgeon, {Aileen M.}",
year = "2018",
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volume = "32",
pages = "191--219",
journal = "Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health",
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History of Pre and Perinatal (PPN) Parent Education : A literature review. / McKee, Christine L.; Stapleton, Peta B.; Pidgeon, Aileen M.

In: Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health, Vol. 32, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 191-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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