High rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis after exhaustive exercise when carbohydrate is coingested with caffeine

David J. Pedersen, Sarah J. Lessard, Vernon G. Coffey, Emmanuel G. Churchley, Andrew M. Wootton, They Ng, Matthew J. Watt, John A. Hawley

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63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We determined the effect of coingestion of caffeine (Caff) with carbohydrate (CHO) on rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery from exhaustive exercise in seven trained subjects who completed two experimental trials in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. The evening before an experiment subjects performed intermittent exhaustive cycling and then consumed a low-CHO meal. The next morning subjects rode until volitional fatigue. On completion of this ride subjects consumed either CHO [4 g/kg body mass (BM)] or the same amount of CHO + Caff (8 mg/kg BM) during 4 h of passive recovery. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken at regular intervals throughout recovery. Muscle glycogen levels were similar at exhaustion [∼75 mmol/kg dry wt (dw)] and increased by a similar amount (∼80%) after 1 h of recovery (133 ± 37.8 vs. 149 ± 48 mmol/kg dw for CHO and Caff, respectively). After 4 h of recovery Caff resulted in higher glycogen accumulation (313 ± 69 vs. 234 ± 50 mmol/kg dw, P < 0.001). Accordingly, the overall rate of resynthesis for the 4-h recovery period was 66% higher in Caff compared with CHO (57.7 ± 18.5 vs. 38.0 ± 7.7 mmol·kg dw-1·h-1, P < 0.05). After 1 h of recovery plasma Caff levels had increased to 31 ± 11 μM (P < 0.001) and at the end of the recovery reached 77 ± 11 μM (P < 0.001) with Caff. Phosphorylation of CaMKThr286 was similar after exercise and after 1 h of recovery, but after 4 h CaMKThr286 phosphorylation was higher in Caff than CHO (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)Thr172 and AktSer473 was similar for both treatments at all time points. We provide the first evidence that in trained subjects coingestion of large amounts of Caff (8 mg/kg BM) with CHO has an additive effect on rates of postexercise muscle glycogen accumulation compared with consumption of CHO alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-13
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume105
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Caffeine
Glycogen
Carbohydrates
Muscles
Phosphorylation
AMP-Activated Protein Kinases
Cross-Over Studies
Fatigue
Meals
Biopsy

Cite this

Pedersen, David J. ; Lessard, Sarah J. ; Coffey, Vernon G. ; Churchley, Emmanuel G. ; Wootton, Andrew M. ; Ng, They ; Watt, Matthew J. ; Hawley, John A. / High rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis after exhaustive exercise when carbohydrate is coingested with caffeine. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2008 ; Vol. 105, No. 1. pp. 7-13.
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abstract = "We determined the effect of coingestion of caffeine (Caff) with carbohydrate (CHO) on rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery from exhaustive exercise in seven trained subjects who completed two experimental trials in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. The evening before an experiment subjects performed intermittent exhaustive cycling and then consumed a low-CHO meal. The next morning subjects rode until volitional fatigue. On completion of this ride subjects consumed either CHO [4 g/kg body mass (BM)] or the same amount of CHO + Caff (8 mg/kg BM) during 4 h of passive recovery. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken at regular intervals throughout recovery. Muscle glycogen levels were similar at exhaustion [∼75 mmol/kg dry wt (dw)] and increased by a similar amount (∼80{\%}) after 1 h of recovery (133 ± 37.8 vs. 149 ± 48 mmol/kg dw for CHO and Caff, respectively). After 4 h of recovery Caff resulted in higher glycogen accumulation (313 ± 69 vs. 234 ± 50 mmol/kg dw, P < 0.001). Accordingly, the overall rate of resynthesis for the 4-h recovery period was 66{\%} higher in Caff compared with CHO (57.7 ± 18.5 vs. 38.0 ± 7.7 mmol·kg dw-1·h-1, P < 0.05). After 1 h of recovery plasma Caff levels had increased to 31 ± 11 μM (P < 0.001) and at the end of the recovery reached 77 ± 11 μM (P < 0.001) with Caff. Phosphorylation of CaMKThr286 was similar after exercise and after 1 h of recovery, but after 4 h CaMKThr286 phosphorylation was higher in Caff than CHO (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)Thr172 and AktSer473 was similar for both treatments at all time points. We provide the first evidence that in trained subjects coingestion of large amounts of Caff (8 mg/kg BM) with CHO has an additive effect on rates of postexercise muscle glycogen accumulation compared with consumption of CHO alone.",
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High rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis after exhaustive exercise when carbohydrate is coingested with caffeine. / Pedersen, David J.; Lessard, Sarah J.; Coffey, Vernon G.; Churchley, Emmanuel G.; Wootton, Andrew M.; Ng, They; Watt, Matthew J.; Hawley, John A.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 105, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 7-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Pedersen, David J.

AU - Lessard, Sarah J.

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AB - We determined the effect of coingestion of caffeine (Caff) with carbohydrate (CHO) on rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery from exhaustive exercise in seven trained subjects who completed two experimental trials in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. The evening before an experiment subjects performed intermittent exhaustive cycling and then consumed a low-CHO meal. The next morning subjects rode until volitional fatigue. On completion of this ride subjects consumed either CHO [4 g/kg body mass (BM)] or the same amount of CHO + Caff (8 mg/kg BM) during 4 h of passive recovery. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken at regular intervals throughout recovery. Muscle glycogen levels were similar at exhaustion [∼75 mmol/kg dry wt (dw)] and increased by a similar amount (∼80%) after 1 h of recovery (133 ± 37.8 vs. 149 ± 48 mmol/kg dw for CHO and Caff, respectively). After 4 h of recovery Caff resulted in higher glycogen accumulation (313 ± 69 vs. 234 ± 50 mmol/kg dw, P < 0.001). Accordingly, the overall rate of resynthesis for the 4-h recovery period was 66% higher in Caff compared with CHO (57.7 ± 18.5 vs. 38.0 ± 7.7 mmol·kg dw-1·h-1, P < 0.05). After 1 h of recovery plasma Caff levels had increased to 31 ± 11 μM (P < 0.001) and at the end of the recovery reached 77 ± 11 μM (P < 0.001) with Caff. Phosphorylation of CaMKThr286 was similar after exercise and after 1 h of recovery, but after 4 h CaMKThr286 phosphorylation was higher in Caff than CHO (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)Thr172 and AktSer473 was similar for both treatments at all time points. We provide the first evidence that in trained subjects coingestion of large amounts of Caff (8 mg/kg BM) with CHO has an additive effect on rates of postexercise muscle glycogen accumulation compared with consumption of CHO alone.

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