Health technology assessment: An evidence-based medicine perspective

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A challenge of health technology assessment is integrating the information from different disciplines. This talk focuses on the evidence-based medicine perspective and challenges 3 assumptions of health technology assessment: assumptions about effectiveness, assumptions about coverage by health technology assessment, and assumptions about costs being immutable. Challenging these assumptions has several implications. First is the need for better evidence on effects: both low-volume, high-cost technologies and low-cost, high-volume technologies that are ineffective drains on health care systems' resources. Second, cheap but effective technologies should be better promoted, as they can displace high-cost technologies. Finally, for effective but expensive technologies, we should work to lower the price and/or costs.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMedical Decision Making
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

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High-Cost Technology
Biomedical Technology Assessment
Evidence-Based Medicine
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Delivery of Health Care

Cite this

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Health technology assessment : An evidence-based medicine perspective. / Glasziou, Paul.

In: Medical Decision Making, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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