Group norms, threat, and children's racial prejudice

Drew Nesdale, Kevin Durkin, Anne Maass, Judith Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

124 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess predictions from social identity development theory (SIDT; Nesdale, 2004) concerning children's ethnic/racial prejudice, 197 Anglo-Australian children ages 7 or 9 years participated in a minimal group study as a member of a team that had a norm of inclusion or exclusion. The team was threatened or not threatened by an out-group that was of the same or different race. Consistent with SIDT, prejudice was greater when the ingroup had a norm of exclusion and there was threat from the out-group. Norms and threat also interacted with participant age to influence ethnic attitudes, although prejudice was greatest when the in-group had an exclusion norm and there was out-group threat. The implications of the findings for SIDT are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)652-663
Number of pages12
JournalChild Development
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2005
Externally publishedYes

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group norm
Racism
outgroup
prejudice
exclusion
threat
Social Identification
development theory
study group
inclusion
Group

Cite this

Nesdale, D., Durkin, K., Maass, A., & Griffiths, J. (2005). Group norms, threat, and children's racial prejudice. Child Development, 76(3), 652-663. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00869.x
Nesdale, Drew ; Durkin, Kevin ; Maass, Anne ; Griffiths, Judith. / Group norms, threat, and children's racial prejudice. In: Child Development. 2005 ; Vol. 76, No. 3. pp. 652-663.
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Nesdale, D, Durkin, K, Maass, A & Griffiths, J 2005, 'Group norms, threat, and children's racial prejudice' Child Development, vol. 76, no. 3, pp. 652-663. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00869.x

Group norms, threat, and children's racial prejudice. / Nesdale, Drew; Durkin, Kevin; Maass, Anne; Griffiths, Judith.

In: Child Development, Vol. 76, No. 3, 01.05.2005, p. 652-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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