Grip strength is associated with marksmanship and defensive tactics, but not injuries, in police recruits

Rob Marc Orr, Michael Stierli, Benjamin Hinton, Michael Steele

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Questions: How important is grip strength in police recruits? Design: A longitudinal cohort study. Participants: New South Wales police recruits. Outcome measures: Dominant hand grip strength measured with a grip dynamometer, marksmanship performance with a 9mm Glock pistol measured by target scores, defensive tactics performance as determined by training instructors and injury results as recorded on the police injury database. Results: Data from two recruit cohorts (Session 1 n=50: Session 2 n=169) were captured. Mean grip strengths were 43.6 kg (±10 kg) and 42.2 kg (±8 kg) for Session 1 and Session 2 respectively with no significance between groups (p=0.287). Of the combined cohorts 26% (n=56) sustained an injury/illness. During Session 2, 12% (n=27) failed defensive tactics and 32% (n=70) failed their initial marksmanship shoot. There was no significant correlation between grip strength measures and injuries/illness (rs[219]=-.126, p=0.63). A moderate, significant correlation was found between grip strength and marksmanship (rs[169]=-.419, p<0.001) with a weak but significant correlation found between grip strength and defensive tactics performance (rs[169]=-.227, p=0.03). Conclusion: Grip strength may not predict injury risk in police officers undergoing recruit training. Grip strength may play a role in the marksmanship and defensive tactics performance of police recruits, however its relationship with these tasks is not strong enough to provide a predictive value.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 17 Oct 2013
EventAustralian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013: New Moves - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 17 Oct 201320 Oct 2013

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013
Abbreviated titleAPA Conference 2013
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period17/10/1320/10/13

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Police
Hand Strength
Wounds and Injuries
New South Wales
Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases

Cite this

Orr, R. M., Stierli, M., Hinton, B., & Steele, M. (2013). Grip strength is associated with marksmanship and defensive tactics, but not injuries, in police recruits. Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia.
Orr, Rob Marc ; Stierli, Michael ; Hinton, Benjamin ; Steele, Michael. / Grip strength is associated with marksmanship and defensive tactics, but not injuries, in police recruits. Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia.
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abstract = "Questions: How important is grip strength in police recruits? Design: A longitudinal cohort study. Participants: New South Wales police recruits. Outcome measures: Dominant hand grip strength measured with a grip dynamometer, marksmanship performance with a 9mm Glock pistol measured by target scores, defensive tactics performance as determined by training instructors and injury results as recorded on the police injury database. Results: Data from two recruit cohorts (Session 1 n=50: Session 2 n=169) were captured. Mean grip strengths were 43.6 kg (±10 kg) and 42.2 kg (±8 kg) for Session 1 and Session 2 respectively with no significance between groups (p=0.287). Of the combined cohorts 26{\%} (n=56) sustained an injury/illness. During Session 2, 12{\%} (n=27) failed defensive tactics and 32{\%} (n=70) failed their initial marksmanship shoot. There was no significant correlation between grip strength measures and injuries/illness (rs[219]=-.126, p=0.63). A moderate, significant correlation was found between grip strength and marksmanship (rs[169]=-.419, p<0.001) with a weak but significant correlation found between grip strength and defensive tactics performance (rs[169]=-.227, p=0.03). Conclusion: Grip strength may not predict injury risk in police officers undergoing recruit training. Grip strength may play a role in the marksmanship and defensive tactics performance of police recruits, however its relationship with these tasks is not strong enough to provide a predictive value.",
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Orr, RM, Stierli, M, Hinton, B & Steele, M 2013, 'Grip strength is associated with marksmanship and defensive tactics, but not injuries, in police recruits' Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia, 17/10/13 - 20/10/13, .

Grip strength is associated with marksmanship and defensive tactics, but not injuries, in police recruits. / Orr, Rob Marc; Stierli, Michael; Hinton, Benjamin; Steele, Michael.

2013. Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Grip strength is associated with marksmanship and defensive tactics, but not injuries, in police recruits

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Stierli, Michael

AU - Hinton, Benjamin

AU - Steele, Michael

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Y1 - 2013/10/17

N2 - Questions: How important is grip strength in police recruits? Design: A longitudinal cohort study. Participants: New South Wales police recruits. Outcome measures: Dominant hand grip strength measured with a grip dynamometer, marksmanship performance with a 9mm Glock pistol measured by target scores, defensive tactics performance as determined by training instructors and injury results as recorded on the police injury database. Results: Data from two recruit cohorts (Session 1 n=50: Session 2 n=169) were captured. Mean grip strengths were 43.6 kg (±10 kg) and 42.2 kg (±8 kg) for Session 1 and Session 2 respectively with no significance between groups (p=0.287). Of the combined cohorts 26% (n=56) sustained an injury/illness. During Session 2, 12% (n=27) failed defensive tactics and 32% (n=70) failed their initial marksmanship shoot. There was no significant correlation between grip strength measures and injuries/illness (rs[219]=-.126, p=0.63). A moderate, significant correlation was found between grip strength and marksmanship (rs[169]=-.419, p<0.001) with a weak but significant correlation found between grip strength and defensive tactics performance (rs[169]=-.227, p=0.03). Conclusion: Grip strength may not predict injury risk in police officers undergoing recruit training. Grip strength may play a role in the marksmanship and defensive tactics performance of police recruits, however its relationship with these tasks is not strong enough to provide a predictive value.

AB - Questions: How important is grip strength in police recruits? Design: A longitudinal cohort study. Participants: New South Wales police recruits. Outcome measures: Dominant hand grip strength measured with a grip dynamometer, marksmanship performance with a 9mm Glock pistol measured by target scores, defensive tactics performance as determined by training instructors and injury results as recorded on the police injury database. Results: Data from two recruit cohorts (Session 1 n=50: Session 2 n=169) were captured. Mean grip strengths were 43.6 kg (±10 kg) and 42.2 kg (±8 kg) for Session 1 and Session 2 respectively with no significance between groups (p=0.287). Of the combined cohorts 26% (n=56) sustained an injury/illness. During Session 2, 12% (n=27) failed defensive tactics and 32% (n=70) failed their initial marksmanship shoot. There was no significant correlation between grip strength measures and injuries/illness (rs[219]=-.126, p=0.63). A moderate, significant correlation was found between grip strength and marksmanship (rs[169]=-.419, p<0.001) with a weak but significant correlation found between grip strength and defensive tactics performance (rs[169]=-.227, p=0.03). Conclusion: Grip strength may not predict injury risk in police officers undergoing recruit training. Grip strength may play a role in the marksmanship and defensive tactics performance of police recruits, however its relationship with these tasks is not strong enough to provide a predictive value.

M3 - Presentation

ER -

Orr RM, Stierli M, Hinton B, Steele M. Grip strength is associated with marksmanship and defensive tactics, but not injuries, in police recruits. 2013. Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia.