Fusion Assessment by MRI in Comparison With CT in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Prospective Study

David Kitchen, Prashanth J. Rao, Mario Zotti, Richard Woodman, Matthew J. Sampson, Dale Allison, Kevin Phan, Michael Selby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of fusion status following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and compare agreement and confidence in assessing fusion or its absence on MRI to the current standard computed tomography (CT). Methods: A prospective follow up of patients undergoing surgery by 2 spine surgeons between 2012 and 2015 at a single institution. Fusion was assessed at different time points in these patients by 2 independent musculoskeletal radiologists. Fusion was analyzed in coronal and sagittal planes using both imaging modalities, with confidence being attributed on a scale of 0 to 3. Assessors were blinded to patient data. Results: Fourteen patients (25 levels) with mean follow-up of 10.2 months (range 2.4-20.3 years) and age of 41 years (range 20.7-61.5 years) were assessed. MRI within the interbody cage in coronal (κ =.58) and sagittal (κ =.50) planes had the highest interobserver agreement. CT anterior to the cage in coronal (κ =.48) and sagittal (κ =.44) planes, as well as within the cage in coronal (κ =.50) and sagittal planes (κ =.44) showed moderate agreement. Confidence anterior to the interbody cage using MRI scan was reduced when compared with remaining angles and imaging modalities. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that MRI may be a useful tool in the assessment of fusion following ALIF with results comparable to CT, and that it may have a useful role in select patients especially considering marked radiation exposure reduction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)586-592
Number of pages7
JournalGlobal Spine Journal
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Prospective Studies
Spine
Cohort Studies

Cite this

Kitchen, David ; Rao, Prashanth J. ; Zotti, Mario ; Woodman, Richard ; Sampson, Matthew J. ; Allison, Dale ; Phan, Kevin ; Selby, Michael. / Fusion Assessment by MRI in Comparison With CT in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion : A Prospective Study. In: Global Spine Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 586-592.
@article{6f51e7756e914298ba9d4d90fdd44d7c,
title = "Fusion Assessment by MRI in Comparison With CT in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Prospective Study",
abstract = "Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of fusion status following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and compare agreement and confidence in assessing fusion or its absence on MRI to the current standard computed tomography (CT). Methods: A prospective follow up of patients undergoing surgery by 2 spine surgeons between 2012 and 2015 at a single institution. Fusion was assessed at different time points in these patients by 2 independent musculoskeletal radiologists. Fusion was analyzed in coronal and sagittal planes using both imaging modalities, with confidence being attributed on a scale of 0 to 3. Assessors were blinded to patient data. Results: Fourteen patients (25 levels) with mean follow-up of 10.2 months (range 2.4-20.3 years) and age of 41 years (range 20.7-61.5 years) were assessed. MRI within the interbody cage in coronal (κ =.58) and sagittal (κ =.50) planes had the highest interobserver agreement. CT anterior to the cage in coronal (κ =.48) and sagittal (κ =.44) planes, as well as within the cage in coronal (κ =.50) and sagittal planes (κ =.44) showed moderate agreement. Confidence anterior to the interbody cage using MRI scan was reduced when compared with remaining angles and imaging modalities. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that MRI may be a useful tool in the assessment of fusion following ALIF with results comparable to CT, and that it may have a useful role in select patients especially considering marked radiation exposure reduction.",
author = "David Kitchen and Rao, {Prashanth J.} and Mario Zotti and Richard Woodman and Sampson, {Matthew J.} and Dale Allison and Kevin Phan and Michael Selby",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/2192568218757483",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "586--592",
journal = "Global Spine Journal",
issn = "2192-5682",
publisher = "Thieme Medical Publishers",
number = "6",

}

Kitchen, D, Rao, PJ, Zotti, M, Woodman, R, Sampson, MJ, Allison, D, Phan, K & Selby, M 2018, 'Fusion Assessment by MRI in Comparison With CT in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Prospective Study' Global Spine Journal, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 586-592. https://doi.org/10.1177/2192568218757483

Fusion Assessment by MRI in Comparison With CT in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion : A Prospective Study. / Kitchen, David; Rao, Prashanth J.; Zotti, Mario; Woodman, Richard; Sampson, Matthew J.; Allison, Dale; Phan, Kevin; Selby, Michael.

In: Global Spine Journal, Vol. 8, No. 6, 01.09.2018, p. 586-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fusion Assessment by MRI in Comparison With CT in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

T2 - A Prospective Study

AU - Kitchen, David

AU - Rao, Prashanth J.

AU - Zotti, Mario

AU - Woodman, Richard

AU - Sampson, Matthew J.

AU - Allison, Dale

AU - Phan, Kevin

AU - Selby, Michael

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of fusion status following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and compare agreement and confidence in assessing fusion or its absence on MRI to the current standard computed tomography (CT). Methods: A prospective follow up of patients undergoing surgery by 2 spine surgeons between 2012 and 2015 at a single institution. Fusion was assessed at different time points in these patients by 2 independent musculoskeletal radiologists. Fusion was analyzed in coronal and sagittal planes using both imaging modalities, with confidence being attributed on a scale of 0 to 3. Assessors were blinded to patient data. Results: Fourteen patients (25 levels) with mean follow-up of 10.2 months (range 2.4-20.3 years) and age of 41 years (range 20.7-61.5 years) were assessed. MRI within the interbody cage in coronal (κ =.58) and sagittal (κ =.50) planes had the highest interobserver agreement. CT anterior to the cage in coronal (κ =.48) and sagittal (κ =.44) planes, as well as within the cage in coronal (κ =.50) and sagittal planes (κ =.44) showed moderate agreement. Confidence anterior to the interbody cage using MRI scan was reduced when compared with remaining angles and imaging modalities. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that MRI may be a useful tool in the assessment of fusion following ALIF with results comparable to CT, and that it may have a useful role in select patients especially considering marked radiation exposure reduction.

AB - Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of fusion status following anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and compare agreement and confidence in assessing fusion or its absence on MRI to the current standard computed tomography (CT). Methods: A prospective follow up of patients undergoing surgery by 2 spine surgeons between 2012 and 2015 at a single institution. Fusion was assessed at different time points in these patients by 2 independent musculoskeletal radiologists. Fusion was analyzed in coronal and sagittal planes using both imaging modalities, with confidence being attributed on a scale of 0 to 3. Assessors were blinded to patient data. Results: Fourteen patients (25 levels) with mean follow-up of 10.2 months (range 2.4-20.3 years) and age of 41 years (range 20.7-61.5 years) were assessed. MRI within the interbody cage in coronal (κ =.58) and sagittal (κ =.50) planes had the highest interobserver agreement. CT anterior to the cage in coronal (κ =.48) and sagittal (κ =.44) planes, as well as within the cage in coronal (κ =.50) and sagittal planes (κ =.44) showed moderate agreement. Confidence anterior to the interbody cage using MRI scan was reduced when compared with remaining angles and imaging modalities. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that MRI may be a useful tool in the assessment of fusion following ALIF with results comparable to CT, and that it may have a useful role in select patients especially considering marked radiation exposure reduction.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053503098&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/2192568218757483

DO - 10.1177/2192568218757483

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 586

EP - 592

JO - Global Spine Journal

JF - Global Spine Journal

SN - 2192-5682

IS - 6

ER -