Floor Mapping: A Novel Method of Integrating Anatomical Structure with Immunological Function

Claire Vogan, Joanna Bishop

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractEducationpeer-review

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Abstract

Anatomy forms the cornerstone of many medical degree programmes but is often taught separately from physiological processes. Immunology can be a challenging subject for medical students; its complex, overlapping processes make it difficult to conceptualise and apply clinically [Lee & Malau‐Aduli, Internet Journal of Medical Education, 2013; 3(1)]. Thus, we designed an integrated teaching method for the Graduate Entry Medical course Swansea, UK, where we linked the structure of the lymph node to its immunological function. The floor of our clinical skills laboratory was converted into a lymph node, students became the B and T cells and, with the aid of interactive white boards, we walked and talked through the processes that occur when an immune response is stimulated. Feedback suggested the session was well‐received and engaged our students. We reflected that it catered for students with multimodal VARK learning styles (Fleming & Mills, To Improve the Academy, 1992; 11, 27–30) and specifically included a kinaesthetic element. This novel method shows that the teaching of basic sciences, such as immunology, can be integrated into anatomy sessions and that the delivery can be engaging, multimodal and potentially stimulates active learning. In addition, the use of a cross‐disciplinary teaching team is likely to further reinforce the student perception of the body and its processes as a single integrated entity.
Original languageEnglish
Article number29
Pages (from-to)14
Number of pages1
JournalMedical Education
Volume50
Issue number52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2016
Event13th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference - National University Of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
Duration: 13 Jan 201317 Jan 2016
Conference number: 13th
http://medicine.nus.edu.sg/cenmed/apmec13/index.shtml
http://medicine.nus.edu.sg/cenmed/apmec13/documents/13th_APMEC_Conference_Handbook.pdf (Conference Handbook)

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title = "Floor Mapping: A Novel Method of Integrating Anatomical Structure with Immunological Function",
abstract = "Anatomy forms the cornerstone of many medical degree programmes but is often taught separately from physiological processes. Immunology can be a challenging subject for medical students; its complex, overlapping processes make it difficult to conceptualise and apply clinically [Lee & Malau‐Aduli, Internet Journal of Medical Education, 2013; 3(1)]. Thus, we designed an integrated teaching method for the Graduate Entry Medical course Swansea, UK, where we linked the structure of the lymph node to its immunological function. The floor of our clinical skills laboratory was converted into a lymph node, students became the B and T cells and, with the aid of interactive white boards, we walked and talked through the processes that occur when an immune response is stimulated. Feedback suggested the session was well‐received and engaged our students. We reflected that it catered for students with multimodal VARK learning styles (Fleming & Mills, To Improve the Academy, 1992; 11, 27–30) and specifically included a kinaesthetic element. This novel method shows that the teaching of basic sciences, such as immunology, can be integrated into anatomy sessions and that the delivery can be engaging, multimodal and potentially stimulates active learning. In addition, the use of a cross‐disciplinary teaching team is likely to further reinforce the student perception of the body and its processes as a single integrated entity.",
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language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "14",
journal = "British journal of medical education",
issn = "0308-0110",
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}

Floor Mapping: A Novel Method of Integrating Anatomical Structure with Immunological Function. / Vogan, Claire ; Bishop, Joanna .

In: Medical Education, Vol. 50, No. 52, 29, 09.2016, p. 14.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractEducationpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Floor Mapping: A Novel Method of Integrating Anatomical Structure with Immunological Function

AU - Vogan, Claire

AU - Bishop, Joanna

PY - 2016/9

Y1 - 2016/9

N2 - Anatomy forms the cornerstone of many medical degree programmes but is often taught separately from physiological processes. Immunology can be a challenging subject for medical students; its complex, overlapping processes make it difficult to conceptualise and apply clinically [Lee & Malau‐Aduli, Internet Journal of Medical Education, 2013; 3(1)]. Thus, we designed an integrated teaching method for the Graduate Entry Medical course Swansea, UK, where we linked the structure of the lymph node to its immunological function. The floor of our clinical skills laboratory was converted into a lymph node, students became the B and T cells and, with the aid of interactive white boards, we walked and talked through the processes that occur when an immune response is stimulated. Feedback suggested the session was well‐received and engaged our students. We reflected that it catered for students with multimodal VARK learning styles (Fleming & Mills, To Improve the Academy, 1992; 11, 27–30) and specifically included a kinaesthetic element. This novel method shows that the teaching of basic sciences, such as immunology, can be integrated into anatomy sessions and that the delivery can be engaging, multimodal and potentially stimulates active learning. In addition, the use of a cross‐disciplinary teaching team is likely to further reinforce the student perception of the body and its processes as a single integrated entity.

AB - Anatomy forms the cornerstone of many medical degree programmes but is often taught separately from physiological processes. Immunology can be a challenging subject for medical students; its complex, overlapping processes make it difficult to conceptualise and apply clinically [Lee & Malau‐Aduli, Internet Journal of Medical Education, 2013; 3(1)]. Thus, we designed an integrated teaching method for the Graduate Entry Medical course Swansea, UK, where we linked the structure of the lymph node to its immunological function. The floor of our clinical skills laboratory was converted into a lymph node, students became the B and T cells and, with the aid of interactive white boards, we walked and talked through the processes that occur when an immune response is stimulated. Feedback suggested the session was well‐received and engaged our students. We reflected that it catered for students with multimodal VARK learning styles (Fleming & Mills, To Improve the Academy, 1992; 11, 27–30) and specifically included a kinaesthetic element. This novel method shows that the teaching of basic sciences, such as immunology, can be integrated into anatomy sessions and that the delivery can be engaging, multimodal and potentially stimulates active learning. In addition, the use of a cross‐disciplinary teaching team is likely to further reinforce the student perception of the body and its processes as a single integrated entity.

U2 - 10.1111/medu.13157

DO - 10.1111/medu.13157

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 50

SP - 14

JO - British journal of medical education

JF - British journal of medical education

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