Fitness assessments as predictors of performance in police occupational tasks

Elisa Canetti, Rob Marc Orr, Ben Schram, W Brown, Jay Dawes

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Aim: To determine the ability of musculoskeletal fitness test scores in predicting performance in police occupational tasks. Design: Retrospective cohort study Methods: Retrospective data from 106 law enforcement officers who completed five fitness assessments (vertical jump (VJ), hand grip strength, leg back dynamometer, 1-minute push-ups and sit-ups) and three routine occupational tasks (1.22m fence jump (FJ), 8.5m victim drag (VD) with 102.3kg and get-up (GU)) were collected. A standard multiple regression was performed to determine if the results in fitness assessments were predictive of performance in the occupational tasks. Results: Models combining all fitness assessments significantly predicted performance in FJ (F(5,88)=12.228, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.61), VD (F(5,88)=9.407, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.45) and GU (F(5,88)=14.319, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.72). Further analysis of individual predictors highlighted that performance in the VJ test was a significant contributor for all models, uniquely predicting 15% of FJ (p<0.001), 4% of VD (p = 0.03) and 8% of GU (p = 0.001). Grip strength uniquely contributed 3% to performance in the VD (p = 0.05) and performance in the sit-up test contributed 8% to GU performance (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Performance in police-specific occupational tasks requires a combination of muscle power, strength and endurance. While power was integral to performance in all occupational tasks performed, attaining and maintaining all components of fitness is essential as they all contribute predicting performance in police officer occupational tasks.
Original languageEnglish
Pages53
Publication statusPublished - 17 Oct 2019
EventAustralian Physiotherapy Association - Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 16 Oct 201919 Oct 2019

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Physiotherapy Association
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period16/10/1919/10/19

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Police
Hand Strength
Muscle Strength
Leg

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Canetti, E., Orr, R. M., Schram, B., Brown, W., & Dawes, J. (2019). Fitness assessments as predictors of performance in police occupational tasks. 53. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association, Adelaide, Australia.
Canetti, Elisa ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Schram, Ben ; Brown, W ; Dawes, Jay. / Fitness assessments as predictors of performance in police occupational tasks. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association, Adelaide, Australia.
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Canetti, E, Orr, RM, Schram, B, Brown, W & Dawes, J 2019, 'Fitness assessments as predictors of performance in police occupational tasks' Australian Physiotherapy Association, Adelaide, Australia, 16/10/19 - 19/10/19, pp. 53.

Fitness assessments as predictors of performance in police occupational tasks. / Canetti, Elisa; Orr, Rob Marc; Schram, Ben; Brown, W; Dawes, Jay.

2019. 53 Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association, Adelaide, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Fitness assessments as predictors of performance in police occupational tasks

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AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Schram, Ben

AU - Brown, W

AU - Dawes, Jay

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Y1 - 2019/10/17

N2 - Aim: To determine the ability of musculoskeletal fitness test scores in predicting performance in police occupational tasks. Design: Retrospective cohort study Methods: Retrospective data from 106 law enforcement officers who completed five fitness assessments (vertical jump (VJ), hand grip strength, leg back dynamometer, 1-minute push-ups and sit-ups) and three routine occupational tasks (1.22m fence jump (FJ), 8.5m victim drag (VD) with 102.3kg and get-up (GU)) were collected. A standard multiple regression was performed to determine if the results in fitness assessments were predictive of performance in the occupational tasks. Results: Models combining all fitness assessments significantly predicted performance in FJ (F(5,88)=12.228, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.61), VD (F(5,88)=9.407, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.45) and GU (F(5,88)=14.319, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.72). Further analysis of individual predictors highlighted that performance in the VJ test was a significant contributor for all models, uniquely predicting 15% of FJ (p<0.001), 4% of VD (p = 0.03) and 8% of GU (p = 0.001). Grip strength uniquely contributed 3% to performance in the VD (p = 0.05) and performance in the sit-up test contributed 8% to GU performance (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Performance in police-specific occupational tasks requires a combination of muscle power, strength and endurance. While power was integral to performance in all occupational tasks performed, attaining and maintaining all components of fitness is essential as they all contribute predicting performance in police officer occupational tasks.

AB - Aim: To determine the ability of musculoskeletal fitness test scores in predicting performance in police occupational tasks. Design: Retrospective cohort study Methods: Retrospective data from 106 law enforcement officers who completed five fitness assessments (vertical jump (VJ), hand grip strength, leg back dynamometer, 1-minute push-ups and sit-ups) and three routine occupational tasks (1.22m fence jump (FJ), 8.5m victim drag (VD) with 102.3kg and get-up (GU)) were collected. A standard multiple regression was performed to determine if the results in fitness assessments were predictive of performance in the occupational tasks. Results: Models combining all fitness assessments significantly predicted performance in FJ (F(5,88)=12.228, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.61), VD (F(5,88)=9.407, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.45) and GU (F(5,88)=14.319, p < 0.001; adjusted R²=0.72). Further analysis of individual predictors highlighted that performance in the VJ test was a significant contributor for all models, uniquely predicting 15% of FJ (p<0.001), 4% of VD (p = 0.03) and 8% of GU (p = 0.001). Grip strength uniquely contributed 3% to performance in the VD (p = 0.05) and performance in the sit-up test contributed 8% to GU performance (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Performance in police-specific occupational tasks requires a combination of muscle power, strength and endurance. While power was integral to performance in all occupational tasks performed, attaining and maintaining all components of fitness is essential as they all contribute predicting performance in police officer occupational tasks.

M3 - Abstract

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ER -

Canetti E, Orr RM, Schram B, Brown W, Dawes J. Fitness assessments as predictors of performance in police occupational tasks. 2019. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association, Adelaide, Australia.