Finding your carbohydrate and fluid sweet-spot - practical and academic considerations

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The ultimate goal in the pursuit of athletic excellence is to perform optimally on a nominated day at major championship events including World Championships and Olympic Games. To compete to their full potential, endurance athletes undertake years of training to facilitate physiological adaptations that increase their ability to sustain the highest possible average power output or speed of movement for a given distance or time. [13] Apart from an athlete's genetic make-up and optimised training programme, perhaps the largest single determinant of ensuring an optimal performance during an endurance event is through the intake of carbohydrate and fluid on race-day. However, the potential advantages associated with a strategic intake of carbohydrate and fluid during exercise [14] need to be balanced with the possibility of gastrointestinal upset associated with their intake. [22] This brief commentary will describe recommendations for carbohydrate and fluid intakes during endurance exercise. Recommendations for carbohydrate and fluid need to be integrated as athletes typically consume carbohydrate during exercise by way of consuming sports drinks which simultaneously provide both carbohydrate and fluid. In fact, a study investigating race-day intakes of elite Olympic distance triathletes, found that carbohydrate intakes were increased during hot races as triathletes consumed more sports drink. [7] Conversely, in cooler weather conditions triathletes consumed less carbohydrate as a direct result of consuming less sports drink. The findings of this study highlight the importance of developing a race nutrition plan which integrates carbohydrate and fluid intake strategies so that carbohydrate and fluid intake goals are independently met.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationScience of Sport, Exercise and Physical Activity in the Tropics
EditorsAndrew Edwards, Anthony Leicht
Place of PublicationTownsville
PublisherJames Cook University
Pages75-82
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781631177392
ISBN (Print)9781631177378
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Carbohydrates
Sports
Athletes
Exercise
Physiological Adaptation
Weather
Education

Cite this

Cox, G. R. (2014). Finding your carbohydrate and fluid sweet-spot - practical and academic considerations. In A. Edwards, & A. Leicht (Eds.), Science of Sport, Exercise and Physical Activity in the Tropics (pp. 75-82). Townsville: James Cook University.
Cox, Gregory R. / Finding your carbohydrate and fluid sweet-spot - practical and academic considerations. Science of Sport, Exercise and Physical Activity in the Tropics. editor / Andrew Edwards ; Anthony Leicht. Townsville : James Cook University, 2014. pp. 75-82
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Cox, GR 2014, Finding your carbohydrate and fluid sweet-spot - practical and academic considerations. in A Edwards & A Leicht (eds), Science of Sport, Exercise and Physical Activity in the Tropics. James Cook University, Townsville, pp. 75-82.

Finding your carbohydrate and fluid sweet-spot - practical and academic considerations. / Cox, Gregory R.

Science of Sport, Exercise and Physical Activity in the Tropics. ed. / Andrew Edwards; Anthony Leicht. Townsville : James Cook University, 2014. p. 75-82.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Cox GR. Finding your carbohydrate and fluid sweet-spot - practical and academic considerations. In Edwards A, Leicht A, editors, Science of Sport, Exercise and Physical Activity in the Tropics. Townsville: James Cook University. 2014. p. 75-82