Feasibility and impact of sit-stand workstations with and without exercise in office workers at risk of low back pain: A pilot comparative effectiveness trial

Venerina Johnston*, Elise M. Gane, Wendy Brown, Bill Vicenzino, Genevieve N. Healy, Nicholas Gilson, Michelle D. Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the feasibility and impact of sit-stand workstations plus advice, with or without exercise, on back pain and sitting time in office workers at risk of low back pain (LBP). Eligible participants (n = 29/169; 17% overall) were randomized to receive a sit-stand workstation and advice with (n = 16) or without (n = 13) progressive resistance exercise training for 4-weeks. Feasibility (recruitment, acceptability, adherence) and impact (LBP severity during a standardized standing task, workplace-sitting time) were assessed. Intervention acceptability (87.5% very satisfied) was good and adherence (60% completed all 12 exercise sessions) was satisfactory. Maximum LBP severity (mean difference of −1.3 (−2.0, −0.6) and workplace sitting time (82.7–99.3 min/8-hr workday reduction) were similarly reduced in both groups. The introduction of a sit-stand workstation with advice was feasible and achieved similar outcomes for LBP and workplace sitting time when administered with or without exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-89
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume76
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019
Externally publishedYes

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