Fatal peptic ulcer complications and the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, and corticosteroids

David A. Henry*, Anne Johnston, Annette Dobson, John Duggan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are known to cause peptic ulcer and its complications, controversy exists about the number of deaths from ulcer which are attributable to their use. A case-control study was therefore performed to determine whether prior use of non-steroidal and other antiinflammatory compounds was associated with an increased case fatality rate from complications of peptic ulcer. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were used by 39% of a series of 80 patients who had died from peptic ulcer complications and by 37% of 160 controls who were survivors matched for sex, age, ulcer site, and nature of complication (odds ratio 1.1; 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 2.1). Similarly, the rates of prior use of aspirin by cases and controls were almost identical (odds ratio 1-2; 95% confidence interval 0. to 1.9). Thus neither non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs nor aspirin were associated with increased case fatality rates from peptic ulcer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1227-1229
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Medical Journal (Clinical research ed.)
Volume295
Issue number6608
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1987
Externally publishedYes

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