Factors affecting the extent of monday blues: Evidence from a meta-analysis

Charles S. Areni, Mitchell Burger, Natalina Zlatevska

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Abstract

A meta-analysis of 34 samples identified a small but reliable "Monday blues" effect (-.08 ≤ d ≤-.06) in samples reporting current or real-time moods for each day of the week. However, the size of the effect in samples reporting recalled summaries of moods experienced over the course of a day varied depending on whether the sample involved university students or nonstudents. University students reporting recalled summaries of daily moods showed a large Monday blues effect (d =-.25), whereas married men who were not students reported smaller effects with greater variance (-.19 ≤ d ≤ -.01). The 34 samples reporting recalled summaries of moods experienced over multiple days produced effects ranging from -.25 to -1.28, but the variance among these samples was too great to estimate an aggregate d statistic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)723-733
Number of pages11
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume109
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

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Areni, Charles S. ; Burger, Mitchell ; Zlatevska, Natalina. / Factors affecting the extent of monday blues : Evidence from a meta-analysis. In: Psychological Reports. 2011 ; Vol. 109, No. 3. pp. 723-733.
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Factors affecting the extent of monday blues : Evidence from a meta-analysis. / Areni, Charles S.; Burger, Mitchell; Zlatevska, Natalina.

In: Psychological Reports, Vol. 109, No. 3, 12.2011, p. 723-733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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