Exploring associations between physical fitness tests and a law enforcement specific physical ability test using principal components analysis

Keston Lindsay, Robert G. Lockie, Rob Marc Orr, Brent Alvar, Charlie Kornhauser, Ryan Holmes, Jay Dawes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine relationships between components of physical fitness on performance in an occupation-specific physical ability test (PAT) for state patrol officers (women, n = 19; men, n = 256) using archived data. Physical fitness was assessed by 2.4 km run time (2.4 R), body fat % (BF), 1 min sit-up (SU), 1-min push-up (PU), the vertical jump (VJ), and the sit-and-reach test (SR). Principal components analysis (PCA) of the entire sample revealed that dynamic fitness (DF), related 2.4 R, SU, PU, VJ, & BF, explained 49% of variance in performance in the PAT. Lower back and hamstring flexibility explained a further 18% of variance. Law-enforcement agencies using a standard job-specific test to screen the occupational fitness of its members may use fitness tests to make fitness recommendations. Officers should prioritize developing aerobic fitness, muscular endurance, lower-body power, and flexibility to help meet the demands of occupational performance.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2021
Externally publishedYes

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