Examining the psychosocial and academic factors predicting depression and anxiety symptomology across first year and later year university students

Natalie Eckberg, Aileen M. Pidgeon, Heidi Magyar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

46 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

University students across the world report higher levels of mental health problems compared to the general population. Past research has focused on investigating mental health problems among first-year university students. However, a paucity of existing research compares the prevalence of mental health problems in first-year university students to students in later year-levels. To address this gap, the current study compared the level of depression and anxiety symptomology experienced by university students (n= 198) from Australia and the United States, across first, second, third, and fourth-year levels. The results found no significant differences in the level of depression and anxiety symptomology between university students from these countries, and no significant differences in the level of depression symptoms across year-levels. However, university students in the second year level reported significantly higher levels of anxiety symptoms compared to first, third, and fourth-year levels. The current study assessed the role of stress appraisal, psychosocial, and coping factors as predictors of depression and anxiety symptoms across all year-levels of university students. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated higher levels of perceived stress and lower levels of perceived social support from family significantly predicted higher levels of depression symptoms. Higher levels of perceived stress and academic avoidance coping, and lower levels of campus connectedness significantly predicted higher levels of anxiety symptoms. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages17
JournalEuropean Scientific Journal
Volume13
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

anxiety
university
student
mental health
coping
social support
regression

Cite this

@article{8b9fb2bc72384aa8a550620f898ea00d,
title = "Examining the psychosocial and academic factors predicting depression and anxiety symptomology across first year and later year university students",
abstract = "University students across the world report higher levels of mental health problems compared to the general population. Past research has focused on investigating mental health problems among first-year university students. However, a paucity of existing research compares the prevalence of mental health problems in first-year university students to students in later year-levels. To address this gap, the current study compared the level of depression and anxiety symptomology experienced by university students (n= 198) from Australia and the United States, across first, second, third, and fourth-year levels. The results found no significant differences in the level of depression and anxiety symptomology between university students from these countries, and no significant differences in the level of depression symptoms across year-levels. However, university students in the second year level reported significantly higher levels of anxiety symptoms compared to first, third, and fourth-year levels. The current study assessed the role of stress appraisal, psychosocial, and coping factors as predictors of depression and anxiety symptoms across all year-levels of university students. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated higher levels of perceived stress and lower levels of perceived social support from family significantly predicted higher levels of depression symptoms. Higher levels of perceived stress and academic avoidance coping, and lower levels of campus connectedness significantly predicted higher levels of anxiety symptoms. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.",
author = "Natalie Eckberg and Pidgeon, {Aileen M.} and Heidi Magyar",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.19044/esj.2017.v13n17p1",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "1--16",
journal = "European Scientific Journal",
issn = "1857-7431",
publisher = "European Scientific Institute",
number = "17",

}

Examining the psychosocial and academic factors predicting depression and anxiety symptomology across first year and later year university students. / Eckberg, Natalie; Pidgeon, Aileen M.; Magyar, Heidi .

In: European Scientific Journal, Vol. 13, No. 17, 2017, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Examining the psychosocial and academic factors predicting depression and anxiety symptomology across first year and later year university students

AU - Eckberg, Natalie

AU - Pidgeon, Aileen M.

AU - Magyar, Heidi

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - University students across the world report higher levels of mental health problems compared to the general population. Past research has focused on investigating mental health problems among first-year university students. However, a paucity of existing research compares the prevalence of mental health problems in first-year university students to students in later year-levels. To address this gap, the current study compared the level of depression and anxiety symptomology experienced by university students (n= 198) from Australia and the United States, across first, second, third, and fourth-year levels. The results found no significant differences in the level of depression and anxiety symptomology between university students from these countries, and no significant differences in the level of depression symptoms across year-levels. However, university students in the second year level reported significantly higher levels of anxiety symptoms compared to first, third, and fourth-year levels. The current study assessed the role of stress appraisal, psychosocial, and coping factors as predictors of depression and anxiety symptoms across all year-levels of university students. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated higher levels of perceived stress and lower levels of perceived social support from family significantly predicted higher levels of depression symptoms. Higher levels of perceived stress and academic avoidance coping, and lower levels of campus connectedness significantly predicted higher levels of anxiety symptoms. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

AB - University students across the world report higher levels of mental health problems compared to the general population. Past research has focused on investigating mental health problems among first-year university students. However, a paucity of existing research compares the prevalence of mental health problems in first-year university students to students in later year-levels. To address this gap, the current study compared the level of depression and anxiety symptomology experienced by university students (n= 198) from Australia and the United States, across first, second, third, and fourth-year levels. The results found no significant differences in the level of depression and anxiety symptomology between university students from these countries, and no significant differences in the level of depression symptoms across year-levels. However, university students in the second year level reported significantly higher levels of anxiety symptoms compared to first, third, and fourth-year levels. The current study assessed the role of stress appraisal, psychosocial, and coping factors as predictors of depression and anxiety symptoms across all year-levels of university students. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated higher levels of perceived stress and lower levels of perceived social support from family significantly predicted higher levels of depression symptoms. Higher levels of perceived stress and academic avoidance coping, and lower levels of campus connectedness significantly predicted higher levels of anxiety symptoms. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

U2 - 10.19044/esj.2017.v13n17p1

DO - 10.19044/esj.2017.v13n17p1

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 1

EP - 16

JO - European Scientific Journal

JF - European Scientific Journal

SN - 1857-7431

IS - 17

ER -