Evidence for dietary fibre modification for the prevention of diverticulitis: A systematic literature review

Megan Crichton, Camilla Dahl, Julie Jenkins-Chapman, Romina Nucera, Wolfgang Marx, Hannah Mackay, Sophie Mahoney, Skye Marshall

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

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Abstract

Background:

The use of dietary fibre manipulation, probiotics and antibiotics have been hypothesised to benefit the management of diverticular disease. However, dietary recommendations for the prevention of diverticulitis are inconsistent and quality evidence is lacking. This systematic review aimed to pool and appraise existing data to give recommendations for dietary fibre modifications with or without probiotics and/or antibiotics in adults for the prevention of diverticulitis.

Methods:

Five electronic databases were searched for studies from database inception until March 2017. Studies were critically appraised and pooled using meta analysis and overall quality of evidence was reviewed using GRADE to make recommendations.

Results:

A long-term high dietary fibre intake (meeting or exceeding the nationally recommended intake for gender and age) after an acute episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis has resolved is recommended to prevent reoccurrence (strong recommendation based on very low-quality evidence). In adults with diverticular disease and no previous history of diverticulitis, insufficient research exists to make recommendations for the use of dietary fibre alone to prevent diverticulitis. Co-administration of dietary fibre with antibiotics appears to have superior effects compared to dietary fibre supplementation alone; however, recommendations for this are not supported in this review due to the high risk of bias in existing research.

Discussion:

Further well conducted randomised controlled trials are required to strengthen recommendations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages51-52
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2017
EventThe First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017 - Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 28 Nov 201730 Nov 2017
https://www.goldcoast.health.qld.gov.au/research/research-week

Conference

ConferenceThe First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period28/11/1730/11/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Diet Therapy
Diverticulitis
Dietary Fiber
Probiotics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Databases
Disease Management
Dietary Supplements
Research
Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials

Cite this

Crichton, M., Dahl, C., Jenkins-Chapman, J., Nucera, R., Marx, W., Mackay, H., ... Marshall, S. (2017). Evidence for dietary fibre modification for the prevention of diverticulitis: A systematic literature review. 51-52. Abstract from The First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017, Gold Coast, Australia.
Crichton, Megan ; Dahl, Camilla ; Jenkins-Chapman, Julie ; Nucera, Romina ; Marx, Wolfgang ; Mackay, Hannah ; Mahoney, Sophie ; Marshall, Skye. / Evidence for dietary fibre modification for the prevention of diverticulitis : A systematic literature review. Abstract from The First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017, Gold Coast, Australia.2 p.
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abstract = "Background:The use of dietary fibre manipulation, probiotics and antibiotics have been hypothesised to benefit the management of diverticular disease. However, dietary recommendations for the prevention of diverticulitis are inconsistent and quality evidence is lacking. This systematic review aimed to pool and appraise existing data to give recommendations for dietary fibre modifications with or without probiotics and/or antibiotics in adults for the prevention of diverticulitis.Methods:Five electronic databases were searched for studies from database inception until March 2017. Studies were critically appraised and pooled using meta analysis and overall quality of evidence was reviewed using GRADE to make recommendations.Results:A long-term high dietary fibre intake (meeting or exceeding the nationally recommended intake for gender and age) after an acute episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis has resolved is recommended to prevent reoccurrence (strong recommendation based on very low-quality evidence). In adults with diverticular disease and no previous history of diverticulitis, insufficient research exists to make recommendations for the use of dietary fibre alone to prevent diverticulitis. Co-administration of dietary fibre with antibiotics appears to have superior effects compared to dietary fibre supplementation alone; however, recommendations for this are not supported in this review due to the high risk of bias in existing research.Discussion:Further well conducted randomised controlled trials are required to strengthen recommendations.",
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Crichton, M, Dahl, C, Jenkins-Chapman, J, Nucera, R, Marx, W, Mackay, H, Mahoney, S & Marshall, S 2017, 'Evidence for dietary fibre modification for the prevention of diverticulitis: A systematic literature review' The First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017, Gold Coast, Australia, 28/11/17 - 30/11/17, pp. 51-52.

Evidence for dietary fibre modification for the prevention of diverticulitis : A systematic literature review. / Crichton, Megan; Dahl, Camilla ; Jenkins-Chapman, Julie; Nucera, Romina; Marx, Wolfgang; Mackay, Hannah; Mahoney, Sophie; Marshall, Skye.

2017. 51-52 Abstract from The First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

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T1 - Evidence for dietary fibre modification for the prevention of diverticulitis

T2 - A systematic literature review

AU - Crichton, Megan

AU - Dahl, Camilla

AU - Jenkins-Chapman, Julie

AU - Nucera, Romina

AU - Marx, Wolfgang

AU - Mackay, Hannah

AU - Mahoney, Sophie

AU - Marshall, Skye

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N2 - Background:The use of dietary fibre manipulation, probiotics and antibiotics have been hypothesised to benefit the management of diverticular disease. However, dietary recommendations for the prevention of diverticulitis are inconsistent and quality evidence is lacking. This systematic review aimed to pool and appraise existing data to give recommendations for dietary fibre modifications with or without probiotics and/or antibiotics in adults for the prevention of diverticulitis.Methods:Five electronic databases were searched for studies from database inception until March 2017. Studies were critically appraised and pooled using meta analysis and overall quality of evidence was reviewed using GRADE to make recommendations.Results:A long-term high dietary fibre intake (meeting or exceeding the nationally recommended intake for gender and age) after an acute episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis has resolved is recommended to prevent reoccurrence (strong recommendation based on very low-quality evidence). In adults with diverticular disease and no previous history of diverticulitis, insufficient research exists to make recommendations for the use of dietary fibre alone to prevent diverticulitis. Co-administration of dietary fibre with antibiotics appears to have superior effects compared to dietary fibre supplementation alone; however, recommendations for this are not supported in this review due to the high risk of bias in existing research.Discussion:Further well conducted randomised controlled trials are required to strengthen recommendations.

AB - Background:The use of dietary fibre manipulation, probiotics and antibiotics have been hypothesised to benefit the management of diverticular disease. However, dietary recommendations for the prevention of diverticulitis are inconsistent and quality evidence is lacking. This systematic review aimed to pool and appraise existing data to give recommendations for dietary fibre modifications with or without probiotics and/or antibiotics in adults for the prevention of diverticulitis.Methods:Five electronic databases were searched for studies from database inception until March 2017. Studies were critically appraised and pooled using meta analysis and overall quality of evidence was reviewed using GRADE to make recommendations.Results:A long-term high dietary fibre intake (meeting or exceeding the nationally recommended intake for gender and age) after an acute episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis has resolved is recommended to prevent reoccurrence (strong recommendation based on very low-quality evidence). In adults with diverticular disease and no previous history of diverticulitis, insufficient research exists to make recommendations for the use of dietary fibre alone to prevent diverticulitis. Co-administration of dietary fibre with antibiotics appears to have superior effects compared to dietary fibre supplementation alone; however, recommendations for this are not supported in this review due to the high risk of bias in existing research.Discussion:Further well conducted randomised controlled trials are required to strengthen recommendations.

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M3 - Abstract

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Crichton M, Dahl C, Jenkins-Chapman J, Nucera R, Marx W, Mackay H et al. Evidence for dietary fibre modification for the prevention of diverticulitis: A systematic literature review. 2017. Abstract from The First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017, Gold Coast, Australia.