Evaluating the introduction of the enhanced primary care 75+ annual health assessments.

T. M. Blakeman, E. J. Comino, N. A. Zwar, M. F. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIM: The study aimed to evaluate what effect the introduction of the enhanced primary care (EPC) health assessments has on the management of elderly patients. METHOD: The study was conducted across five Divisions of General Practice in South West Sydney. Twenty-one general practitioners participated in the study following response to an initial faxed questionnaire survey. An audit of patients' health assessments in conjunction with their records was conducted between June and August 2000. RESULTS: There were significant increase in the documentation of nonmedical problems and of patients' immunisation status. However, there was no increase in plans to refer patients to psychologists, mental health teams or social workers. Also no assessments resulted in a case conference and very few in a care plan. DISCUSSION: Health assessments are unlikely to improve clinical outcomes if they do not result in multidisciplinary care, including care plans, for patients with psychosocial and functional needs. CONCLUSION: Support strategies need to be implemented which assist general practitioners' management of psychosocial and functional problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1004-1009
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume30
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

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Primary Health Care
Health
General Practitioners
General Practice
Documentation
Immunization
Patient Care
Mental Health
Psychology

Cite this

Blakeman, T. M. ; Comino, E. J. ; Zwar, N. A. ; Harris, M. F. / Evaluating the introduction of the enhanced primary care 75+ annual health assessments. In: Australian Family Physician. 2001 ; Vol. 30, No. 10. pp. 1004-1009.
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Evaluating the introduction of the enhanced primary care 75+ annual health assessments. / Blakeman, T. M.; Comino, E. J.; Zwar, N. A.; Harris, M. F.

In: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 30, No. 10, 01.01.2001, p. 1004-1009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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