Evaluating current practice in the provision of written information to stroke patients and their carers

Tammy C Hoffmann, Kryss McKenna, Linda Worrall, Stephen J. Read

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The study described in this chapter aimed to determine current practice in the provision of writteninformation to fifty-seven su’oke patients and their caters. It also explored their informational needs whilein hospital and six months later and examined the suitability of the written materials received, comparingreadability levels to participants’ general reading ability.While in hospital, 22.8% of patients and 41.7% ofcarets received written information, yet 91.2% of patients and 100% of carets wanted information. Morethan half of the participants wanted information on preventing strokes, causes and risk factors of stroke,recovery, what a stroke is, stroke-related medications and sources of further information.At six monthsafter stroke, 75.5% of patients and all caters wanted further information. The mean SMOG readabilitylevel of the written materials received was equivalent to a grade I I level of education, compared with thepatients’ mean reading ability, which was equivalent to a 7th-Sth grade reading level.The authors concludethat stroke patients and their carets want substantially more information than they are receiving, both whilein hospital and six months later.The majority of written information that is distributed to these people isunsuitable in terms of readability levels and other factors.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStroke
Subtitle of host publicationTherapy and rehabilitation
EditorsR White
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherQuay Books
Pages151-163
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9781856422475
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

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    Hoffmann, T. C., McKenna, K., Worrall, L., & Read, S. J. (2005). Evaluating current practice in the provision of written information to stroke patients and their carers. In R. White (Ed.), Stroke: Therapy and rehabilitation (pp. 151-163). Quay Books.