Establishment level correlates of HR practice

Cynthia D Fisher, James Benjamin Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tests the contingency view that HR practices at establishments will vary with differences in corporate headquarters location (Eastern versus Western), establishment size, rate of technological change, and presence of a formal HRM department on site. These factors were expected to be related to HR practices in a range of areas including recruiting and selection, training promotion, appraisal, and formalization of HR policies and job descriptions. Most hypotheses received support in a sample of establishments doing business in Singapore. Contrary to results in North American studies, but as expected in a Singaporean environment, extent of unionization was not a significant predictor of many practices.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-46
Number of pages17
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Human Resources
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 1993

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Correlates
HR practices
Establishment size
Recruiting
Predictors
Headquarters
Formalization
Job description
Factors
Singapore
Technological change
Contingency
Unionization

Cite this

Fisher, Cynthia D ; Shaw, James Benjamin. / Establishment level correlates of HR practice. In: Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources. 1993 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 30-46.
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Establishment level correlates of HR practice. / Fisher, Cynthia D; Shaw, James Benjamin.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.06.1993, p. 30-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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