Establishing a military-specific injury pyramid to inform injury risk management

Rodney Pope, Rob Marc Orr

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Aim: To establish a contemporary, military-specific, injury pyramid to inform injury risk management
Design: Literature review with quantitative synthesis.
Method: Recent reports documenting primary and secondary analyses of recorded injury rates, levels of injury severity, and levels of reporting and non- or under-reporting of injuries in Australian and United States military populations were gathered and reviewed. Key data were extracted and synthesised to develop a contemporary military-specific injury pyramid for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) that could inform future injury risk management.
Results: The estimated ratio of fatalities: serious injuries: minor/ moderate injuries was 1: 62: 19550. Evidence indicates that half of the minor/ moderate injuries may go unreported and be self-managed, and that another 45% of minor/moderate injuries may be reported to ADF healthcare providers but not to work health and safety incident reporting systems. Top reasons for non-reporting include: fear of career impacts; avoiding duty-limiting medical profiles; inconvenience of seeking treatment; and avoiding negative perceptions from others.
Conclusion: Estimates of unreported injuries should be considered alongside reported injuries when estimating military injury risks. There a range of reasons military personnel do not report and instead selfmanage their injuries. Understanding this assists in more accurately assessing injury risks and ensuring
injury management (or self-management) is optimised and risks associated with injury self-management are well-managed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages232-233
Publication statusPublished - 17 Oct 2019
EventTRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference - Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 17 Oct 201919 Oct 2019
https://transform.physio/
https://transform.physio/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Abstract_Book_Adelaide_2019.pdf (Abstracts)
https://transform.physio/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/APA_2019_POCKET_PROGRAM_A5_2.pdf%22 (Full Program)

Conference

ConferenceTRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period17/10/1919/10/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Risk Management
Wounds and Injuries
Self Care
Military Personnel
Health Personnel

Cite this

Pope, R., & Orr, R. M. (2019). Establishing a military-specific injury pyramid to inform injury risk management. 232-233. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
Pope, Rodney ; Orr, Rob Marc. / Establishing a military-specific injury pyramid to inform injury risk management. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
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Pope, R & Orr, RM 2019, 'Establishing a military-specific injury pyramid to inform injury risk management' TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia, 17/10/19 - 19/10/19, pp. 232-233.

Establishing a military-specific injury pyramid to inform injury risk management. / Pope, Rodney; Orr, Rob Marc.

2019. 232-233 Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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N2 - Aim: To establish a contemporary, military-specific, injury pyramid to inform injury risk managementDesign: Literature review with quantitative synthesis.Method: Recent reports documenting primary and secondary analyses of recorded injury rates, levels of injury severity, and levels of reporting and non- or under-reporting of injuries in Australian and United States military populations were gathered and reviewed. Key data were extracted and synthesised to develop a contemporary military-specific injury pyramid for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) that could inform future injury risk management.Results: The estimated ratio of fatalities: serious injuries: minor/ moderate injuries was 1: 62: 19550. Evidence indicates that half of the minor/ moderate injuries may go unreported and be self-managed, and that another 45% of minor/moderate injuries may be reported to ADF healthcare providers but not to work health and safety incident reporting systems. Top reasons for non-reporting include: fear of career impacts; avoiding duty-limiting medical profiles; inconvenience of seeking treatment; and avoiding negative perceptions from others.Conclusion: Estimates of unreported injuries should be considered alongside reported injuries when estimating military injury risks. There a range of reasons military personnel do not report and instead selfmanage their injuries. Understanding this assists in more accurately assessing injury risks and ensuringinjury management (or self-management) is optimised and risks associated with injury self-management are well-managed.

AB - Aim: To establish a contemporary, military-specific, injury pyramid to inform injury risk managementDesign: Literature review with quantitative synthesis.Method: Recent reports documenting primary and secondary analyses of recorded injury rates, levels of injury severity, and levels of reporting and non- or under-reporting of injuries in Australian and United States military populations were gathered and reviewed. Key data were extracted and synthesised to develop a contemporary military-specific injury pyramid for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) that could inform future injury risk management.Results: The estimated ratio of fatalities: serious injuries: minor/ moderate injuries was 1: 62: 19550. Evidence indicates that half of the minor/ moderate injuries may go unreported and be self-managed, and that another 45% of minor/moderate injuries may be reported to ADF healthcare providers but not to work health and safety incident reporting systems. Top reasons for non-reporting include: fear of career impacts; avoiding duty-limiting medical profiles; inconvenience of seeking treatment; and avoiding negative perceptions from others.Conclusion: Estimates of unreported injuries should be considered alongside reported injuries when estimating military injury risks. There a range of reasons military personnel do not report and instead selfmanage their injuries. Understanding this assists in more accurately assessing injury risks and ensuringinjury management (or self-management) is optimised and risks associated with injury self-management are well-managed.

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Pope R, Orr RM. Establishing a military-specific injury pyramid to inform injury risk management. 2019. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.