Engaging law students to promote psychological health

James Duffy, Rachael M Field, Melinda Shirley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2009, the Brain and Mind Research Institute ('BMRI'), with the financial support of the Tristan Jepson Memorial Foundation, conducted a survey of 741 law students studying at 13 Australian law schools. This research is part of a body of work which has raised concerns about the psychological health of Australian law students. According to the BMRI's study, 35.2 per cent of law students experience high levels of psychological distress. This can be compared with 17.8 per cent of medicine students who experience high levels of psychological distress and 13.3 per cent of people aged between 18 and 34 in the general population. The results of the BMRI study mirror similar trends for law students in the United States.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)250-254
Number of pages5
JournalAlternative Law Journal 
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Cite this

Duffy, James ; Field, Rachael M ; Shirley, Melinda. / Engaging law students to promote psychological health. In: Alternative Law Journal . 2011 ; Vol. 36, No. 4. pp. 250-254.
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Engaging law students to promote psychological health. / Duffy, James; Field, Rachael M; Shirley, Melinda.

In: Alternative Law Journal , Vol. 36, No. 4, 2011, p. 250-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Duffy, James

AU - Field, Rachael M

AU - Shirley, Melinda

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AB - In 2009, the Brain and Mind Research Institute ('BMRI'), with the financial support of the Tristan Jepson Memorial Foundation, conducted a survey of 741 law students studying at 13 Australian law schools. This research is part of a body of work which has raised concerns about the psychological health of Australian law students. According to the BMRI's study, 35.2 per cent of law students experience high levels of psychological distress. This can be compared with 17.8 per cent of medicine students who experience high levels of psychological distress and 13.3 per cent of people aged between 18 and 34 in the general population. The results of the BMRI study mirror similar trends for law students in the United States.

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JO - Alternative Law Journal

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