Employment status, attributional style and psychological well-being: A study of Vietnamese employed and unemployed in Queensland

Toan Nguyen, Kathryn Gow, RE Hicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to examine the psychological impact of employment status, locus of control and attribution stability in the Vietnamese community in a Queensland sample. It was hypothesised that employment status, locus of control and stability of attributions regarding employment status would contribute significantly to the prediction of depression, anxiety, stress and somatisation symptomatology. One hundred and seventeen people in the Vietnamese community participated in this community-based explorative research. Results indicated that employment status and locus of control made significant contributions to the prediction of depression, stress, anxiety and somatisation. The clinical implication from the current research is that in the Asian community studied, individuals who encounter an adverse situation such as unemployment, and internally attribute that adverse experience to themselves, have a higher risk of developing mental disorders. Practitioners working in the field may find this information useful in their consultations with the 'at-risk' community.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
JournalAdvances in Mental Health
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2007

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Internal-External Control
Psychology
Anxiety
Depression
Unemployment
Research
Mental Disorders
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Employment status, attributional style and psychological well-being : A study of Vietnamese employed and unemployed in Queensland. / Nguyen, Toan; Gow, Kathryn; Hicks, RE.

In: Advances in Mental Health, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.11.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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