Employee retention: Job embeddedness in the hospitality industry

Laurina Yam, Michael Raybould

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Hospitality is a labour intensive industry, requiring human resources with various skilllevels, ranging from unskilled positions to positions that require high levels of services andcustomer contact skills. Despite the industry relying heavily on employees, high turnover ratesand associated cost of turnover and low retention of skilled employees are issues that plague thehospitality industry (Baum, 2008; Carbery, Garavan, Orien & McDonnell, 2003; Hinkin &Tracey, 2000; Walsh & Taylor, 2007). Recent turnover research in 64 four to five star Australian hotels showed turnover rates of 50.74% for operational employees and 39.19% for managerial employees; furthermore, the average cost of replacing an operational employee is A$9,591, with higher costs for replacing a managerial employee (Davidson, Timo & Wang,2009). The costs of turnover are not only monetary, it can also lead to customer dissatisfaction,decreased employee morale, decreased productivity, inconsistent service quality, impacting on business acumen and organisational performance (Cho, Johanson & Guchait, 2009).Accordingly, hospitality employee turnover, job satisfaction, organisational commitment and retention strategies are frequently researched areas (Birdir, 2002; Deery, 2008; Tracey & Hinkin, 2008).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 9th APacCHRIE Conference
EditorsK Chon
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherThe Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventAsia Pacific CHRIE Conference: Hospitality and tourism education: From a vision to an icon - The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong , Hong Kong
Duration: 2 Jun 20115 Jun 2011
Conference number: 9th
http://www.apacchrie.org/conferences.html

Conference

ConferenceAsia Pacific CHRIE Conference
Abbreviated titleAPacCHRIE
CountryHong Kong
CityHong Kong
Period2/06/115/06/11
Internet address

Fingerprint

Employee retention
Job embeddedness
Employees
Hospitality industry
Turnover
Costs
Industry
Hospitality
Organizational performance
Level of service
Labor
Job satisfaction
Business performance
Morale
Productivity
Average cost
Employee turnover
Human resources
Organizational commitment
Service quality

Cite this

Yam, L., & Raybould, M. (2011). Employee retention: Job embeddedness in the hospitality industry. In K. Chon (Ed.), Proceedings of the 9th APacCHRIE Conference (pp. 1-6). Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
Yam, Laurina ; Raybould, Michael. / Employee retention: Job embeddedness in the hospitality industry. Proceedings of the 9th APacCHRIE Conference. editor / K Chon. Hong Kong : The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2011. pp. 1-6
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title = "Employee retention: Job embeddedness in the hospitality industry",
abstract = "Hospitality is a labour intensive industry, requiring human resources with various skilllevels, ranging from unskilled positions to positions that require high levels of services andcustomer contact skills. Despite the industry relying heavily on employees, high turnover ratesand associated cost of turnover and low retention of skilled employees are issues that plague thehospitality industry (Baum, 2008; Carbery, Garavan, Orien & McDonnell, 2003; Hinkin &Tracey, 2000; Walsh & Taylor, 2007). Recent turnover research in 64 four to five star Australian hotels showed turnover rates of 50.74{\%} for operational employees and 39.19{\%} for managerial employees; furthermore, the average cost of replacing an operational employee is A$9,591, with higher costs for replacing a managerial employee (Davidson, Timo & Wang,2009). The costs of turnover are not only monetary, it can also lead to customer dissatisfaction,decreased employee morale, decreased productivity, inconsistent service quality, impacting on business acumen and organisational performance (Cho, Johanson & Guchait, 2009).Accordingly, hospitality employee turnover, job satisfaction, organisational commitment and retention strategies are frequently researched areas (Birdir, 2002; Deery, 2008; Tracey & Hinkin, 2008).",
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Yam, L & Raybould, M 2011, Employee retention: Job embeddedness in the hospitality industry. in K Chon (ed.), Proceedings of the 9th APacCHRIE Conference. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, pp. 1-6, Asia Pacific CHRIE Conference, Hong Kong , Hong Kong, 2/06/11.

Employee retention: Job embeddedness in the hospitality industry. / Yam, Laurina; Raybould, Michael.

Proceedings of the 9th APacCHRIE Conference. ed. / K Chon. Hong Kong : The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2011. p. 1-6.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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Yam L, Raybould M. Employee retention: Job embeddedness in the hospitality industry. In Chon K, editor, Proceedings of the 9th APacCHRIE Conference. Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. 2011. p. 1-6