Emotions in organizations

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

There has been an “affective revolution” in organizational behavior since the mid-1990s, focusing initially on moods and affective dispositions. The past decade has seen a further shift toward investigating the complex roles played by discrete emotions in the workplace. Discrete emotions such as fear, anger, boredom, love, gratitude, and pride have their own appraisal antecedents, subjective experiences, and action tendencies that prepare people to respond to their current situation. Emotions have intrapersonal effects on the person experiencing them in terms of attention, motivation, creativity, information processing and judgment, and well-being. Some emotions have characteristic voice tones or facial expressions that serve the interpersonal function of communicating one’s state to interaction partners. For this reason, emotions are integral to social processes in organizations such as leadership, teamwork, negotiation, and customer service. The effects of emotions on behavior can be complex and context-dependent rather than straightforwardly mechanistic. Individuals may regulate the emotions they experience, the extent to which they display what they feel, and the actions they choose in response to how they feel.

Research has tended to focus on negative emotions (e.g., anger or anxiety) and their potential negative effects (e.g., aggression or avoidance), but negative emotions can sometimes have positive consequences. Discrete positive emotions have been relatively ignored in organizational research but feeling and expressing positive emotions often have positive consequences. There is considerable scope for investigating the ways in which specific discrete emotions are experienced, regulated, expressed, and acted upon in organizational life. There may also be a case for intentional efforts by organizations and employees to increase the occurrence of positive emotions at work.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOxford Research Encyclopedia of Business and Management
EditorsR. J. Aldag
PublisherOxford University Press
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

Fingerprint

emotion
anger
anxiety
boredom
organizational behavior
facial expression
teamwork
social process
information processing
mood
disposition
aggression
creativity
love
experience
customer
workplace
well-being
employee
leadership

Cite this

Fisher, C. D. (2019). Emotions in organizations. In R. J. Aldag (Ed.), Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Business and Management Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190224851.013.160
Fisher, Cynthia D. / Emotions in organizations. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Business and Management. editor / R. J. Aldag. Oxford University Press, 2019.
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Fisher, CD 2019, Emotions in organizations. in RJ Aldag (ed.), Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Business and Management. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190224851.013.160

Emotions in organizations. / Fisher, Cynthia D.

Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Business and Management. ed. / R. J. Aldag. Oxford University Press, 2019.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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