Eight-month test-retest agreement in morning salivary cortisol, self- and parent-rated anxiety in boys with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Christopher F. Sharpley, Vicki Bitsika, Linda L. Agnew, Nicholas M. Andronicos

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The agreement over time in morning salivary cortisol concentrations and also self- and parent-rated anxiety was investigated in a sample of 16 boys with an ASD. Cortisol and anxiety data were collected eight months apart. Results indicated that there were significant correlations between each pair of measures from the two occasions, suggesting that cortisol concentrations and anxiety did not vary much at all over that time, challenging the assumption that cortisol needs to be measured over multiple days to obtain reliable data from children with an ASD. Implications for research into the ways these children respond to chronic stressors are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)207-212
    Number of pages6
    JournalPhysiology and Behavior
    Volume151
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015

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    Hydrocortisone
    Anxiety
    Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Boys
    Cortisol
    Autism Spectrum Disorders
    Research

    Cite this

    Sharpley, Christopher F. ; Bitsika, Vicki ; Agnew, Linda L. ; Andronicos, Nicholas M. / Eight-month test-retest agreement in morning salivary cortisol, self- and parent-rated anxiety in boys with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. In: Physiology and Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 151. pp. 207-212.
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    Eight-month test-retest agreement in morning salivary cortisol, self- and parent-rated anxiety in boys with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. / Sharpley, Christopher F.; Bitsika, Vicki; Agnew, Linda L.; Andronicos, Nicholas M.

    In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 151, 01.11.2015, p. 207-212.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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