Effects of two contrast training programs on jump performance in rugby union players during a competition phase

Christos K. Argus, Nicholas D. Gill, Justin W L Keogh, Michael R. McGuigan, Will G. Hopkins

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Abstract

Purpose: There is little literature comparing contrast training programs typically performed by team-sport athletes within a competitive phase. We compared the effects of two contrast training programs on a range of measures in high-level rugby union players during the competition season. Methods: The programs consisted of a higher volume-load (strength-power) or lower volume-load (speed-power) resistance training; each included a tapering of loading (higher force early in the week, higher velocity later in the week) and was performed twice a week for 4 wk. Eighteen players were assessed for peak power during a bodyweight countermovement jump (BWCMJ), bodyweight squat jump (BWSJ), 50 kg countermovement jump (50CMJ), 50 kg squat jump (50SJ), broad jump (BJ), and reactive strength index (RSI; jump height divided by contact time during a depth jump). Players were then randomized to either training group and were reassessed following the intervention. Inferences were based on uncertainty in outcomes relative to thresholds for standardized changes. Results: There were small between-group differences in favor of strength-power training for mean changes in the 50CMJ (8%; 90% confidence limits, ±8%), 50SJ (8%; ±10%), and BJ (2%; ±3%). Differences between groups for BWCMJ, BWSJ, and reactive strength index were unclear. For most measures there were smaller individual differences in changes with strength-power training. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that high-level rugby union athletes should be exposed to higher volume-load contrast training which includes one heavy lifting session each week for larger and more uniform adaptation to occur in explosive power throughout a competitive phase of the season.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-75
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Football
Education
Resistance Training
Athletes
Individuality
Uncertainty
Sports
Power (Psychology)

Cite this

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title = "Effects of two contrast training programs on jump performance in rugby union players during a competition phase",
abstract = "Purpose: There is little literature comparing contrast training programs typically performed by team-sport athletes within a competitive phase. We compared the effects of two contrast training programs on a range of measures in high-level rugby union players during the competition season. Methods: The programs consisted of a higher volume-load (strength-power) or lower volume-load (speed-power) resistance training; each included a tapering of loading (higher force early in the week, higher velocity later in the week) and was performed twice a week for 4 wk. Eighteen players were assessed for peak power during a bodyweight countermovement jump (BWCMJ), bodyweight squat jump (BWSJ), 50 kg countermovement jump (50CMJ), 50 kg squat jump (50SJ), broad jump (BJ), and reactive strength index (RSI; jump height divided by contact time during a depth jump). Players were then randomized to either training group and were reassessed following the intervention. Inferences were based on uncertainty in outcomes relative to thresholds for standardized changes. Results: There were small between-group differences in favor of strength-power training for mean changes in the 50CMJ (8{\%}; 90{\%} confidence limits, ±8{\%}), 50SJ (8{\%}; ±10{\%}), and BJ (2{\%}; ±3{\%}). Differences between groups for BWCMJ, BWSJ, and reactive strength index were unclear. For most measures there were smaller individual differences in changes with strength-power training. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that high-level rugby union athletes should be exposed to higher volume-load contrast training which includes one heavy lifting session each week for larger and more uniform adaptation to occur in explosive power throughout a competitive phase of the season.",
author = "Argus, {Christos K.} and Gill, {Nicholas D.} and Keogh, {Justin W L} and McGuigan, {Michael R.} and Hopkins, {Will G.}",
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Effects of two contrast training programs on jump performance in rugby union players during a competition phase. / Argus, Christos K.; Gill, Nicholas D.; Keogh, Justin W L; McGuigan, Michael R.; Hopkins, Will G.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2012, p. 68-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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