Effects of temperature, clothing and task complexity on job performance and satisfaction

Stephen C Vickroy, James Benjamin Shaw, Cynthia D Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examined the effects of room temperature, clothing, and task complexity on task performance and satisfaction. 120 18-22 yr old male college students worked on either a mathematical problem-solving task or a collating task. Room temperature was maintained at either 65 or 78[PHI] during the task session. Ss were requested to wear either a suit (or sport coat), long sleeve shirt, and tie; or a short-sleeve shirt with no tie. Ss were administered the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Results show that Ss wearing appropriate clothing for the temperature conditions showed higher levels of performance and satisfaction with the working condition than did those wearing inappropriate clothing, regardless of task complexity. Similar results were found for intrinsic task satisfaction only for the simpler task.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-102
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume67
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Clothing
Job Satisfaction
Temperature
Task Performance and Analysis
Sports
Students
Work Performance

Cite this

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title = "Effects of temperature, clothing and task complexity on job performance and satisfaction",
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Effects of temperature, clothing and task complexity on job performance and satisfaction. / Vickroy, Stephen C; Shaw, James Benjamin; Fisher, Cynthia D.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 67, No. 1, 01.01.1982, p. 97-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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