Effects of group membership, intergroup competition and out-group ethnicity on children's ratings of in-group and out-group similarity and positivity

Drew Nesdale, Judith A. Griffiths, Kevin Durkin, Anne Maass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on self-categorization theory (SCT; Turner, Hogg, Oakes, Reicher, & Wetherell, 1987), this study examined the extent to which 7- and 10-year-old children's perceptions of similarity to, and positivity towards, their in-group would be increased by factors predicted to enhance the salience of in-group-out-group categorizations. In a minimal group study, participants met the in-group before or after the out-group (group timing), the out-group had the same or different ethnicity as the in-group (out-group ethnicity), and there was or was not to be a competition between the in-group and the out-group (intergroup competition). Ratings of the in-group similarity were influenced by the out-group ethnicity, but not by group timing or intergroup competition. Consistent with SCT, participants rated themselves as more similar to the in-group when the out-group had different vs. the same ethnicity. SCT's predictions concerning in-group positivity were not confirmed. Instead, participants rated the in-group more positively than the out-group and the in-group was rated more positively, when participants met the in-group before rather than after the out-group. Older compared with younger participants were also more prepared to change groups when the out-group had different ethnicity. The implications for SCT are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-373
Number of pages15
JournalBritish Journal of Developmental Psychology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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abstract = "Based on self-categorization theory (SCT; Turner, Hogg, Oakes, Reicher, & Wetherell, 1987), this study examined the extent to which 7- and 10-year-old children's perceptions of similarity to, and positivity towards, their in-group would be increased by factors predicted to enhance the salience of in-group-out-group categorizations. In a minimal group study, participants met the in-group before or after the out-group (group timing), the out-group had the same or different ethnicity as the in-group (out-group ethnicity), and there was or was not to be a competition between the in-group and the out-group (intergroup competition). Ratings of the in-group similarity were influenced by the out-group ethnicity, but not by group timing or intergroup competition. Consistent with SCT, participants rated themselves as more similar to the in-group when the out-group had different vs. the same ethnicity. SCT's predictions concerning in-group positivity were not confirmed. Instead, participants rated the in-group more positively than the out-group and the in-group was rated more positively, when participants met the in-group before rather than after the out-group. Older compared with younger participants were also more prepared to change groups when the out-group had different ethnicity. The implications for SCT are discussed.",
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Effects of group membership, intergroup competition and out-group ethnicity on children's ratings of in-group and out-group similarity and positivity. / Nesdale, Drew; Griffiths, Judith A.; Durkin, Kevin; Maass, Anne.

In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.09.2007, p. 359-373.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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