Effect of personal activity intelligence (PAI) monitoring in the maintenance phase of cardiac rehabilitation: a mixed methods evaluation

Amanda Hannan*, Wayne A Hing, Jeff S Coombes, Suzanne Gough, Michael Climstein, Geoff Adsett, Rohan Jayasinghe, James Furness

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background
Personal activity intelligence (PAI) is a single physical activity metric based upon heart rate responses to physical activity. Maintaining 100 PAI/week is associated with a 25% risk reduction in cardiovascular disease mortality and 50 PAI/week provides 60% of the benefits. The effect of utilising this metric within a cardiac population has not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of PAI monitoring on the amount and/or intensity of physical activity for people in the maintenance phase of cardiac rehabilitation and to explore participants’ perceptions of this approach.

Methods
A concurrent mixed methods approach was undertaken. Participants in the maintenance phase of cardiac rehabilitation monitored PAI for six weeks via a wearable physical activity monitoring device (WPAM). In the first three weeks participants were blinded to their PAI score. A quality-of-life questionnaire (EQ-5D-5L) was completed, and semi-structured interviews conducted to investigate attitudes to PAI monitoring. Daily PAI data was collected throughout the 6-week period.

Results
Twenty participants completed the trial. PAI earned/day was increased after participants could view their data (mean difference: 2.1 PAI/day (95% CI 0.3, 4.0), p = 0.027). The median change in percentage of days participants achieved a Total PAI score of 25 (p = 0.023) and 50 (p = 0.015) were also increased. The mean change in total scores for the EQ-5D-5L and EQVAS were improved after 6 weeks (0.6 ± 1.05; 95% CI (0.11–1.09); p = 0.019); (5.8/100; 95% CI (2.4–9.2); p = 0.002 respectively). Thematic framework analysis identified three global themes (perceptions on the WPAM, PAI and factors affecting exercise). Most participants stated motivation to exercise increased after they could view their PAI data. Many of the participants believed they would continue to use PAI long-term. Others were undecided; the latter primarily due to technical issues and/or preferring devices with greater functionality and attractiveness. All participants would recommend PAI.

Conclusion
This exploratory study showed monitoring PAI via a WPAM increased the amount and/or intensity of physical activity within the cardiac population. Participants found PAI interesting, beneficial, and motivating. If technical issues, aesthetics, and functionality of the WPAM were improved, participants may continue to use the approach long-term. PAI may be a viable strategy to assist people with cardiac disease maintain physical activity adherence.
Original languageEnglish
Article number124
Number of pages18
JournalBMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Oct 2021

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