Effect of Drinking Rate on the Retention of Water or Milk Following Exercise-Induced Dehydration

Liam Sayer, Nidia Rodriguez-Sanchez, Paola Rodriguez-Giustiniani, Christopher Irwin, Danielle McCartney, Gregory R Cox, Stuart D R Galloway, Ben Desbrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of drinking rate on fluid retention of milk and water following exercise-induced dehydration. In Part A, 12 male participants lost 1.9% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water or low-fat milk equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Beverages were ingested over 30 or 90 min, resulting in four beverage treatments: water 30 min, water 90 min, milk 30 min, and milk 90 min. In Part B, 12 participants (nine males and three females) lost 2.0% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Water was ingested over 15 min (DR15), 45 min (DR45), or 90 min (DR90), with either DR15 or DR45 repeated. In both trials, nude body mass, urine volume, urine specific gravity and osmolality, plasma osmolality, and subjective ratings of gastrointestinal symptoms were obtained preexercise and every hour for 3 hr after the onset of drinking. In Part A, no effect of drinking rate was observed on the proportion of fluid retained, but milk retention was greater (p < .01) than water (water 30 min: 57% ± 16%, water 90 min: 60% ± 20%, milk 30 min: 83% ± 6%, and milk 90 min: 85% ± 7%). In Part B, fluid retention was greater in DR90 (57% ± 13%) than DR15 (50% ± 11%, p < .05), but this was within test-retest variation determined from the repeated trials (coefficient of variation: 17%). Within the range of drinking rates investigated the nutrient composition of a beverage has a more pronounced impact on fluid retention than the ingestion rate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Dec 2019

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dehydration (animal physiology)
drinking
Dehydration
Drinking
Milk
exercise
milk
Water
Beverages
water
beverages
sweat
Sweat
osmolality
Osmolar Concentration
urine
Urine
low fat milk
Specific Gravity
Water Purification

Cite this

Sayer, Liam ; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Nidia ; Rodriguez-Giustiniani, Paola ; Irwin, Christopher ; McCartney, Danielle ; Cox, Gregory R ; Galloway, Stuart D R ; Desbrow, Ben. / Effect of Drinking Rate on the Retention of Water or Milk Following Exercise-Induced Dehydration. In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 2019 ; pp. 1-11.
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title = "Effect of Drinking Rate on the Retention of Water or Milk Following Exercise-Induced Dehydration",
abstract = "This study investigated the effect of drinking rate on fluid retention of milk and water following exercise-induced dehydration. In Part A, 12 male participants lost 1.9{\%} ± 0.3{\%} body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water or low-fat milk equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Beverages were ingested over 30 or 90 min, resulting in four beverage treatments: water 30 min, water 90 min, milk 30 min, and milk 90 min. In Part B, 12 participants (nine males and three females) lost 2.0{\%} ± 0.3{\%} body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Water was ingested over 15 min (DR15), 45 min (DR45), or 90 min (DR90), with either DR15 or DR45 repeated. In both trials, nude body mass, urine volume, urine specific gravity and osmolality, plasma osmolality, and subjective ratings of gastrointestinal symptoms were obtained preexercise and every hour for 3 hr after the onset of drinking. In Part A, no effect of drinking rate was observed on the proportion of fluid retained, but milk retention was greater (p < .01) than water (water 30 min: 57{\%} ± 16{\%}, water 90 min: 60{\%} ± 20{\%}, milk 30 min: 83{\%} ± 6{\%}, and milk 90 min: 85{\%} ± 7{\%}). In Part B, fluid retention was greater in DR90 (57{\%} ± 13{\%}) than DR15 (50{\%} ± 11{\%}, p < .05), but this was within test-retest variation determined from the repeated trials (coefficient of variation: 17{\%}). Within the range of drinking rates investigated the nutrient composition of a beverage has a more pronounced impact on fluid retention than the ingestion rate.",
author = "Liam Sayer and Nidia Rodriguez-Sanchez and Paola Rodriguez-Giustiniani and Christopher Irwin and Danielle McCartney and Cox, {Gregory R} and Galloway, {Stuart D R} and Ben Desbrow",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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Effect of Drinking Rate on the Retention of Water or Milk Following Exercise-Induced Dehydration. / Sayer, Liam; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Nidia; Rodriguez-Giustiniani, Paola; Irwin, Christopher; McCartney, Danielle; Cox, Gregory R; Galloway, Stuart D R; Desbrow, Ben.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 04.12.2019, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Desbrow, Ben

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N2 - This study investigated the effect of drinking rate on fluid retention of milk and water following exercise-induced dehydration. In Part A, 12 male participants lost 1.9% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water or low-fat milk equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Beverages were ingested over 30 or 90 min, resulting in four beverage treatments: water 30 min, water 90 min, milk 30 min, and milk 90 min. In Part B, 12 participants (nine males and three females) lost 2.0% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Water was ingested over 15 min (DR15), 45 min (DR45), or 90 min (DR90), with either DR15 or DR45 repeated. In both trials, nude body mass, urine volume, urine specific gravity and osmolality, plasma osmolality, and subjective ratings of gastrointestinal symptoms were obtained preexercise and every hour for 3 hr after the onset of drinking. In Part A, no effect of drinking rate was observed on the proportion of fluid retained, but milk retention was greater (p < .01) than water (water 30 min: 57% ± 16%, water 90 min: 60% ± 20%, milk 30 min: 83% ± 6%, and milk 90 min: 85% ± 7%). In Part B, fluid retention was greater in DR90 (57% ± 13%) than DR15 (50% ± 11%, p < .05), but this was within test-retest variation determined from the repeated trials (coefficient of variation: 17%). Within the range of drinking rates investigated the nutrient composition of a beverage has a more pronounced impact on fluid retention than the ingestion rate.

AB - This study investigated the effect of drinking rate on fluid retention of milk and water following exercise-induced dehydration. In Part A, 12 male participants lost 1.9% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water or low-fat milk equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Beverages were ingested over 30 or 90 min, resulting in four beverage treatments: water 30 min, water 90 min, milk 30 min, and milk 90 min. In Part B, 12 participants (nine males and three females) lost 2.0% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Water was ingested over 15 min (DR15), 45 min (DR45), or 90 min (DR90), with either DR15 or DR45 repeated. In both trials, nude body mass, urine volume, urine specific gravity and osmolality, plasma osmolality, and subjective ratings of gastrointestinal symptoms were obtained preexercise and every hour for 3 hr after the onset of drinking. In Part A, no effect of drinking rate was observed on the proportion of fluid retained, but milk retention was greater (p < .01) than water (water 30 min: 57% ± 16%, water 90 min: 60% ± 20%, milk 30 min: 83% ± 6%, and milk 90 min: 85% ± 7%). In Part B, fluid retention was greater in DR90 (57% ± 13%) than DR15 (50% ± 11%, p < .05), but this was within test-retest variation determined from the repeated trials (coefficient of variation: 17%). Within the range of drinking rates investigated the nutrient composition of a beverage has a more pronounced impact on fluid retention than the ingestion rate.

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DO - 10.1123/ijsnem.2019-0176

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JO - International Journal of Sport Nutrition

JF - International Journal of Sport Nutrition

SN - 1526-484X

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