Early management of meningococcal disease: Do attitudes of GPs influence practice?

Kari Jarvinen, Linda Selvey, Chris Del Mar, Michael Tilse, Robyn Pugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Survival from early meningococcal disease might be improved if general practitioners followed guidelines by immediately administering parenteral antibiotics (before hospital referral). METHODS: Structured telephone interviews with 20 GPs who had previously treated meningococcal cases. RESULTS: General practitioners knew guideline recommendations for early management of meningococcal disease: early parenteral antibiotics would be given by about half the GPs entertaining a diagnosis of meningococcal infection. Barriers to immediate treatment were: diagnostic uncertainty, regarding the case as nonurgent, and practising close to a hospital. DISCUSSION: Diagnosing meningococcal disease is difficult in general practice. Early antibiotic administration for suspected cases is appropriate even in close proximity to referral hospitals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)892-894
Number of pages3
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume34
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Disease Management
Anti-Bacterial Agents
General Practitioners
Referral and Consultation
Meningococcal Infections
Guidelines
General Practice
Uncertainty
Interviews
Therapeutics

Cite this

Jarvinen, Kari ; Selvey, Linda ; Del Mar, Chris ; Tilse, Michael ; Pugh, Robyn. / Early management of meningococcal disease : Do attitudes of GPs influence practice?. In: Australian Family Physician. 2005 ; Vol. 34, No. 10. pp. 892-894.
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Jarvinen, K, Selvey, L, Del Mar, C, Tilse, M & Pugh, R 2005, 'Early management of meningococcal disease: Do attitudes of GPs influence practice?' Australian Family Physician, vol. 34, no. 10, pp. 892-894.

Early management of meningococcal disease : Do attitudes of GPs influence practice? / Jarvinen, Kari; Selvey, Linda; Del Mar, Chris; Tilse, Michael; Pugh, Robyn.

In: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 34, No. 10, 2005, p. 892-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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