Don’t Go Breaking My Heart: The Effects of Ability-Based Training on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Custody Assistant Recruits

Karly A. Cesario , Ashley M. Bloodgood, Javier Hernandez, Rob Marc Orr, Jay J. Dawes, Joseph Dulla, Matthew R. Moreno, Robert G. Lockie

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

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Abstract

Custody Assistants (CAs) are responsible for security in detention facilities, where they may be required to complete high-intensity physical actions to ensure the personal safety of themselves, personnel, and inmates. Due to these job demands, and need for overall fitness, physical training (PT) programs are commonly implemented during academy. A paramilitary one-size-fits-all model, via modalities such as formation runs and bodyweight calisthenics, are a common form of PT. However, this type of training may not be optimal for each individual CA recruit to make positive adaptations. The purpose of this study was to analyze an ability-based approach to PT in a CA academy compared to the traditional approach. Retrospective analysis was performed on data from two CA classes consisting of 39 (23 men, 16 women) and 36 (22 men, 13 women) recruits. Recruits in the first class received 15 PT sessions in the traditional training (TT) model, where recruits were expected to all complete the same exercises and distance runs. Recruits in the ability-based training (ABT) group were subject to 15 PT sessions comprising of an ABT circuit and interval running workouts. Pre- and post-academy training, health and fitness assessments were performed, which included: resting heart rate (RHR); systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP); push-ups and sit-ups in 60 s; and recovery heart rate from the YMCA step test. Changes in these assessments were compared using 2x2 factorial ANOVA for each measure, and a repeated measures ANOVA for each class (p < 0.05). Results revealed significant differences in performance in both classes for both the recovery heart rate for the YMCA (reduced) and push-ups (increased), with no difference between the groups. The ABT group significantly lowered their RHR post academy (6.5 mean reduction in bpm). Systolic BP did not significantly change post-academy for either group, while diastolic BP increased in the TT group (5.8 mmHg mean increase) but not the ABT group. Although TT and ABT achieved similar changes in fitness as measured in this study, the ABT group was able to achieve these while also reducing RHR and maintaining diastolic BP. RHR can be a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Any increases in diastolic BP for the TT group could be a maladaptation to the rigors of academy, including chronic stress and the physical training load. BP is also a factor in predicting the development of coronary heart disease. Given these positive adaptations in heart rate and BP for CAs, further research should be done to confirm these results and investigate the wider and systemic implementation of ABT in CA.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018
EventThe 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine - Costa Mesa Hilton, Costa Mesa, United States
Duration: 26 Oct 201827 Oct 2018
Conference number: 38th
https://www.acsm.org/acsm-membership/regional-chapters/acsm-chapters/southwest/southwest-l2

Conference

ConferenceThe 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine
Abbreviated titleSWACSM
CountryUnited States
CityCosta Mesa
Period26/10/1827/10/18
Internet address

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Blood Pressure
Health
Heart Rate
Gymnastics
Physical Fitness
Exercise Test
Running
Coronary Disease
Analysis of Variance
Exercise
Education
Mortality
Research

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Cesario , K. A., Bloodgood, A. M., Hernandez, J., Orr, R. M., Dawes, J. J., Dulla, J., ... Lockie, R. G. (2018). Don’t Go Breaking My Heart: The Effects of Ability-Based Training on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Custody Assistant Recruits. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.
Cesario , Karly A. ; Bloodgood, Ashley M. ; Hernandez, Javier ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Dawes, Jay J. ; Dulla, Joseph ; Moreno, Matthew R. ; Lockie, Robert G. / Don’t Go Breaking My Heart: The Effects of Ability-Based Training on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Custody Assistant Recruits. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.
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title = "Don’t Go Breaking My Heart: The Effects of Ability-Based Training on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Custody Assistant Recruits",
abstract = "Custody Assistants (CAs) are responsible for security in detention facilities, where they may be required to complete high-intensity physical actions to ensure the personal safety of themselves, personnel, and inmates. Due to these job demands, and need for overall fitness, physical training (PT) programs are commonly implemented during academy. A paramilitary one-size-fits-all model, via modalities such as formation runs and bodyweight calisthenics, are a common form of PT. However, this type of training may not be optimal for each individual CA recruit to make positive adaptations. The purpose of this study was to analyze an ability-based approach to PT in a CA academy compared to the traditional approach. Retrospective analysis was performed on data from two CA classes consisting of 39 (23 men, 16 women) and 36 (22 men, 13 women) recruits. Recruits in the first class received 15 PT sessions in the traditional training (TT) model, where recruits were expected to all complete the same exercises and distance runs. Recruits in the ability-based training (ABT) group were subject to 15 PT sessions comprising of an ABT circuit and interval running workouts. Pre- and post-academy training, health and fitness assessments were performed, which included: resting heart rate (RHR); systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP); push-ups and sit-ups in 60 s; and recovery heart rate from the YMCA step test. Changes in these assessments were compared using 2x2 factorial ANOVA for each measure, and a repeated measures ANOVA for each class (p < 0.05). Results revealed significant differences in performance in both classes for both the recovery heart rate for the YMCA (reduced) and push-ups (increased), with no difference between the groups. The ABT group significantly lowered their RHR post academy (6.5 mean reduction in bpm). Systolic BP did not significantly change post-academy for either group, while diastolic BP increased in the TT group (5.8 mmHg mean increase) but not the ABT group. Although TT and ABT achieved similar changes in fitness as measured in this study, the ABT group was able to achieve these while also reducing RHR and maintaining diastolic BP. RHR can be a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Any increases in diastolic BP for the TT group could be a maladaptation to the rigors of academy, including chronic stress and the physical training load. BP is also a factor in predicting the development of coronary heart disease. Given these positive adaptations in heart rate and BP for CAs, further research should be done to confirm these results and investigate the wider and systemic implementation of ABT in CA.",
author = "Cesario, {Karly A.} and Bloodgood, {Ashley M.} and Javier Hernandez and Orr, {Rob Marc} and Dawes, {Jay J.} and Joseph Dulla and Moreno, {Matthew R.} and Lockie, {Robert G.}",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
language = "English",
note = "The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, SWACSM ; Conference date: 26-10-2018 Through 27-10-2018",
url = "https://www.acsm.org/acsm-membership/regional-chapters/acsm-chapters/southwest/southwest-l2",

}

Cesario , KA, Bloodgood, AM, Hernandez, J, Orr, RM, Dawes, JJ, Dulla, J, Moreno, MR & Lockie, RG 2018, 'Don’t Go Breaking My Heart: The Effects of Ability-Based Training on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Custody Assistant Recruits' The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States, 26/10/18 - 27/10/18, .

Don’t Go Breaking My Heart: The Effects of Ability-Based Training on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Custody Assistant Recruits. / Cesario , Karly A. ; Bloodgood, Ashley M. ; Hernandez, Javier; Orr, Rob Marc; Dawes, Jay J.; Dulla, Joseph; Moreno, Matthew R. ; Lockie, Robert G.

2018. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - Don’t Go Breaking My Heart: The Effects of Ability-Based Training on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Custody Assistant Recruits

AU - Cesario , Karly A.

AU - Bloodgood, Ashley M.

AU - Hernandez, Javier

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Dawes, Jay J.

AU - Dulla, Joseph

AU - Moreno, Matthew R.

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - Custody Assistants (CAs) are responsible for security in detention facilities, where they may be required to complete high-intensity physical actions to ensure the personal safety of themselves, personnel, and inmates. Due to these job demands, and need for overall fitness, physical training (PT) programs are commonly implemented during academy. A paramilitary one-size-fits-all model, via modalities such as formation runs and bodyweight calisthenics, are a common form of PT. However, this type of training may not be optimal for each individual CA recruit to make positive adaptations. The purpose of this study was to analyze an ability-based approach to PT in a CA academy compared to the traditional approach. Retrospective analysis was performed on data from two CA classes consisting of 39 (23 men, 16 women) and 36 (22 men, 13 women) recruits. Recruits in the first class received 15 PT sessions in the traditional training (TT) model, where recruits were expected to all complete the same exercises and distance runs. Recruits in the ability-based training (ABT) group were subject to 15 PT sessions comprising of an ABT circuit and interval running workouts. Pre- and post-academy training, health and fitness assessments were performed, which included: resting heart rate (RHR); systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP); push-ups and sit-ups in 60 s; and recovery heart rate from the YMCA step test. Changes in these assessments were compared using 2x2 factorial ANOVA for each measure, and a repeated measures ANOVA for each class (p < 0.05). Results revealed significant differences in performance in both classes for both the recovery heart rate for the YMCA (reduced) and push-ups (increased), with no difference between the groups. The ABT group significantly lowered their RHR post academy (6.5 mean reduction in bpm). Systolic BP did not significantly change post-academy for either group, while diastolic BP increased in the TT group (5.8 mmHg mean increase) but not the ABT group. Although TT and ABT achieved similar changes in fitness as measured in this study, the ABT group was able to achieve these while also reducing RHR and maintaining diastolic BP. RHR can be a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Any increases in diastolic BP for the TT group could be a maladaptation to the rigors of academy, including chronic stress and the physical training load. BP is also a factor in predicting the development of coronary heart disease. Given these positive adaptations in heart rate and BP for CAs, further research should be done to confirm these results and investigate the wider and systemic implementation of ABT in CA.

AB - Custody Assistants (CAs) are responsible for security in detention facilities, where they may be required to complete high-intensity physical actions to ensure the personal safety of themselves, personnel, and inmates. Due to these job demands, and need for overall fitness, physical training (PT) programs are commonly implemented during academy. A paramilitary one-size-fits-all model, via modalities such as formation runs and bodyweight calisthenics, are a common form of PT. However, this type of training may not be optimal for each individual CA recruit to make positive adaptations. The purpose of this study was to analyze an ability-based approach to PT in a CA academy compared to the traditional approach. Retrospective analysis was performed on data from two CA classes consisting of 39 (23 men, 16 women) and 36 (22 men, 13 women) recruits. Recruits in the first class received 15 PT sessions in the traditional training (TT) model, where recruits were expected to all complete the same exercises and distance runs. Recruits in the ability-based training (ABT) group were subject to 15 PT sessions comprising of an ABT circuit and interval running workouts. Pre- and post-academy training, health and fitness assessments were performed, which included: resting heart rate (RHR); systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP); push-ups and sit-ups in 60 s; and recovery heart rate from the YMCA step test. Changes in these assessments were compared using 2x2 factorial ANOVA for each measure, and a repeated measures ANOVA for each class (p < 0.05). Results revealed significant differences in performance in both classes for both the recovery heart rate for the YMCA (reduced) and push-ups (increased), with no difference between the groups. The ABT group significantly lowered their RHR post academy (6.5 mean reduction in bpm). Systolic BP did not significantly change post-academy for either group, while diastolic BP increased in the TT group (5.8 mmHg mean increase) but not the ABT group. Although TT and ABT achieved similar changes in fitness as measured in this study, the ABT group was able to achieve these while also reducing RHR and maintaining diastolic BP. RHR can be a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Any increases in diastolic BP for the TT group could be a maladaptation to the rigors of academy, including chronic stress and the physical training load. BP is also a factor in predicting the development of coronary heart disease. Given these positive adaptations in heart rate and BP for CAs, further research should be done to confirm these results and investigate the wider and systemic implementation of ABT in CA.

UR - https://www.acsm.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/swacsm-2018-program684bdc1fc67b43fe9b81c68223661da0.pdf?sfvrsn=a95abbd4_0

M3 - Poster

ER -

Cesario KA, Bloodgood AM, Hernandez J, Orr RM, Dawes JJ, Dulla J et al. Don’t Go Breaking My Heart: The Effects of Ability-Based Training on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Custody Assistant Recruits. 2018. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.