Does the ileal brake mechanism contribute to sustained weight loss after bariatric surgery?

Savio G. Barreto, Stijn Soenen, Jacob Chisholm, Ian Chapman, Lilian Kow

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective strategy for treating morbid obesity. Weight regain following significant weight loss, however, remains a problem, with the outcome proportional to the period of follow-up. This review revisits a well-established physiological neurohormonally-mediated feedback loop, the so called ileal brake mechanism, with a special emphasis on the gut hormone peptide tyrosine tyrosine. The manuscript not only highlights the potential role of the ileal brake mechanism in weight loss and weight maintenance thereafter following obesity surgery, it also provides a compelling argument for using this appetite suppressing feedback loop to enable sustained long-term weight loss in patients undergoing surgery for morbid obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-25
Number of pages6
JournalANZ Journal of Surgery
Volume88
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bariatric Surgery
Weight Loss
Morbid Obesity
tyrosyltyrosine
Weights and Measures
Manuscripts
Appetite
Obesity
Maintenance
Hormones

Cite this

Barreto, Savio G. ; Soenen, Stijn ; Chisholm, Jacob ; Chapman, Ian ; Kow, Lilian. / Does the ileal brake mechanism contribute to sustained weight loss after bariatric surgery?. In: ANZ Journal of Surgery. 2018 ; Vol. 88, No. 1-2. pp. 20-25.
@article{d1913c5f38f841e0aaff48158077a936,
title = "Does the ileal brake mechanism contribute to sustained weight loss after bariatric surgery?",
abstract = "Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective strategy for treating morbid obesity. Weight regain following significant weight loss, however, remains a problem, with the outcome proportional to the period of follow-up. This review revisits a well-established physiological neurohormonally-mediated feedback loop, the so called ileal brake mechanism, with a special emphasis on the gut hormone peptide tyrosine tyrosine. The manuscript not only highlights the potential role of the ileal brake mechanism in weight loss and weight maintenance thereafter following obesity surgery, it also provides a compelling argument for using this appetite suppressing feedback loop to enable sustained long-term weight loss in patients undergoing surgery for morbid obesity.",
author = "Barreto, {Savio G.} and Stijn Soenen and Jacob Chisholm and Ian Chapman and Lilian Kow",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ans.14062",
language = "English",
volume = "88",
pages = "20--25",
journal = "Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery",
issn = "1445-1433",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1-2",

}

Does the ileal brake mechanism contribute to sustained weight loss after bariatric surgery? / Barreto, Savio G.; Soenen, Stijn; Chisholm, Jacob; Chapman, Ian; Kow, Lilian.

In: ANZ Journal of Surgery, Vol. 88, No. 1-2, 01.01.2018, p. 20-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does the ileal brake mechanism contribute to sustained weight loss after bariatric surgery?

AU - Barreto, Savio G.

AU - Soenen, Stijn

AU - Chisholm, Jacob

AU - Chapman, Ian

AU - Kow, Lilian

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective strategy for treating morbid obesity. Weight regain following significant weight loss, however, remains a problem, with the outcome proportional to the period of follow-up. This review revisits a well-established physiological neurohormonally-mediated feedback loop, the so called ileal brake mechanism, with a special emphasis on the gut hormone peptide tyrosine tyrosine. The manuscript not only highlights the potential role of the ileal brake mechanism in weight loss and weight maintenance thereafter following obesity surgery, it also provides a compelling argument for using this appetite suppressing feedback loop to enable sustained long-term weight loss in patients undergoing surgery for morbid obesity.

AB - Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective strategy for treating morbid obesity. Weight regain following significant weight loss, however, remains a problem, with the outcome proportional to the period of follow-up. This review revisits a well-established physiological neurohormonally-mediated feedback loop, the so called ileal brake mechanism, with a special emphasis on the gut hormone peptide tyrosine tyrosine. The manuscript not only highlights the potential role of the ileal brake mechanism in weight loss and weight maintenance thereafter following obesity surgery, it also provides a compelling argument for using this appetite suppressing feedback loop to enable sustained long-term weight loss in patients undergoing surgery for morbid obesity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020315087&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ans.14062

DO - 10.1111/ans.14062

M3 - Review article

VL - 88

SP - 20

EP - 25

JO - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery

JF - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery

SN - 1445-1433

IS - 1-2

ER -