Does the curriculum matter in peer mentoring? From mentee to mentor in problem‐based learning: a unique case study

Michelle McLean*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Peer mentoring has been used for many years by the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine to integrate new students into the academic and social culture of the institution. In 2001, an unusual situation arose. A problem‐based learning (PBL) curriculum was introduced and the first cohort in this programme was mentored by senior traditional curriculum students. The present study, by canvassing the 2002 PBL mentors, set out to determine whether the mismatch in curricula impacted on students' mentoring experiences. There was overwhelming agreement that curriculum did matter—it is only when mentors are able to share the same experiences as mentees, can they fully understand student problems. Notwithstanding this and other difficulties (e.g. timetable clashes), some 2001 mentees did form bonds with their traditional curriculum mentors. Some even identified them as role models. The 2002 PBL mentors also indicated that they had undergone considerable personal development as a result of their experiences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-186
Number of pages14
JournalMentoring and Tutoring: Partnership in Learning
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Does the curriculum matter in peer mentoring? From mentee to mentor in problem‐based learning: a unique case study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this