Does psychological resilience buffer against the link between the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and depression following stress

Christopher F. Sharpley, David R H Christie, Vicki Bitsika, Nicholas M. Andronicos, Linda L. Agnew, Mary E McMillan

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Abstract

The comparative strength of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism as a 'predictor' of depression after major stress, versus the 'protective' effect of psychological resilience (PR) against depression after major stress, was tested in a homogeneous sample of older men who had all received a diagnosis and treatment for prostate cancer. Results supported the association between PR and lower depression after stress, but did not support the association between the 5-HTTLPR and elevated depression after stress. Examination of PR at scale, factor, and item level identified the specific PR-related behaviour that was the most powerful predictor of low depression. These data suggest that the carriage of the short form of the 5-HTTLPR may negate the protective effect of PR against depression in these men, or that PR may nullify the depression vulnerability of this form of the 5-HTTLPR. These findings may explain some of the 'null' findings regarding the link between the 5-HTTLPR and depression in the wider literature by arguing for an interaction between these two factors in the association between major stress and depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-59
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume180
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Psychological Resilience
Buffers
Depression
Resilience
Psychological
Polymorphism
Prostatic Neoplasms

Cite this

Sharpley, C. F., Christie, D. R. H., Bitsika, V., Andronicos, N. M., Agnew, L. L., & McMillan, M. E. (2017). Does psychological resilience buffer against the link between the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and depression following stress. Physiology and Behavior, 180, 53-59. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.07.029
Sharpley, Christopher F. ; Christie, David R H ; Bitsika, Vicki ; Andronicos, Nicholas M. ; Agnew, Linda L. ; McMillan, Mary E. / Does psychological resilience buffer against the link between the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and depression following stress. In: Physiology and Behavior. 2017 ; Vol. 180. pp. 53-59.
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Does psychological resilience buffer against the link between the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and depression following stress. / Sharpley, Christopher F.; Christie, David R H; Bitsika, Vicki; Andronicos, Nicholas M.; Agnew, Linda L.; McMillan, Mary E.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 180, 15.10.2017, p. 53-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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