Does Australia really need mandatory data breach notification laws - and If so, what kind?

Sara Smyth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

IT security is a vital part of the competitive strategy of any business as it facilitates the collection, storage and transmission of personal information which is vital to success in today's global marketplace. Yet safeguarding information has become a complex task for organisations operating within global information networks, as it invariably exposes them to new securityrisks.1 Until recently, businesses could cover up data security breaches because they were not under a legal duty to disclose them to anyone.2However, the enactment of data breach notification laws in many parts of the Western world has uncovered the misuse of data by organisations in a variety of industry sectors. This is significant when one considers that just one data security breach can jeopardize the personal information of people in multiple jurisdictions around the world.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-24
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Law, Information and Science
Volume22
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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data security
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Does Australia really need mandatory data breach notification laws - and If so, what kind? / Smyth, Sara.

In: Journal of Law, Information and Science, Vol. 22, No. 1, 2013, p. 1-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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