Do we really know what they were testing? Incomplete reporting of interventions in randomised trials of upper limb therapies in unilateral cerebral palsy

Leanne Sakzewski, Sarah Reedman, Tammy Hoffmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Incomplete reporting of components of interventions limits uptake of evidence into clinical practice. Aims To evaluate the completeness of reporting of research and control interventions in randomised trials of upper limb therapies for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Methods and procedures Sixty randomized trials were included, encompassing 60 research and 68 control interventions. Using the 12-item Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist, two reviewers independently rated intervention and control descriptions. Outcomes and results When using 50% of studies as the benchmark, five of the 12 TIDieR items for the research intervention, eight of the 12 items for the control intervention and 11 of 12 items for “usual care” interventions were inadequately reported. Procedures used to deliver the research intervention were adequately reported for 63% of studies. Materials were used in 94% of research interventions, yet only 27% provided details to access/replicate materials. Training materials for interventionists were used in 38% of trials, 10 (17%) had procedure manuals, yet only 3 reported details to access materials. The location where the research intervention was provided was detailed in 65% of studies. Reporting of all items was poorer for the control intervention. Conclusions No study adequately reported all elements on the TIDieR checklist. Details crucial for replication of interventions and interpretation of results were missing. Authors, reviewers, and editors all have a responsibility to improve the quality of intervention reporting in published trials. The TIDieR guide is a potential solution, helping to structure accounts of interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)417-427
Number of pages11
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume59
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016

Fingerprint

Cerebral Palsy
Upper Extremity
Research
Checklist
Therapeutics
Benchmarking

Cite this

@article{5abd0ecdcf664837ab9cbbf01d4c732b,
title = "Do we really know what they were testing? Incomplete reporting of interventions in randomised trials of upper limb therapies in unilateral cerebral palsy",
abstract = "Background Incomplete reporting of components of interventions limits uptake of evidence into clinical practice. Aims To evaluate the completeness of reporting of research and control interventions in randomised trials of upper limb therapies for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Methods and procedures Sixty randomized trials were included, encompassing 60 research and 68 control interventions. Using the 12-item Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist, two reviewers independently rated intervention and control descriptions. Outcomes and results When using 50{\%} of studies as the benchmark, five of the 12 TIDieR items for the research intervention, eight of the 12 items for the control intervention and 11 of 12 items for “usual care” interventions were inadequately reported. Procedures used to deliver the research intervention were adequately reported for 63{\%} of studies. Materials were used in 94{\%} of research interventions, yet only 27{\%} provided details to access/replicate materials. Training materials for interventionists were used in 38{\%} of trials, 10 (17{\%}) had procedure manuals, yet only 3 reported details to access materials. The location where the research intervention was provided was detailed in 65{\%} of studies. Reporting of all items was poorer for the control intervention. Conclusions No study adequately reported all elements on the TIDieR checklist. Details crucial for replication of interventions and interpretation of results were missing. Authors, reviewers, and editors all have a responsibility to improve the quality of intervention reporting in published trials. The TIDieR guide is a potential solution, helping to structure accounts of interventions.",
author = "Leanne Sakzewski and Sarah Reedman and Tammy Hoffmann",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ridd.2016.09.018",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "417--427",
journal = "Applied Research in Mental Retardation",
issn = "0891-4222",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Do we really know what they were testing? Incomplete reporting of interventions in randomised trials of upper limb therapies in unilateral cerebral palsy. / Sakzewski, Leanne; Reedman, Sarah; Hoffmann, Tammy.

In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 59, 01.12.2016, p. 417-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do we really know what they were testing? Incomplete reporting of interventions in randomised trials of upper limb therapies in unilateral cerebral palsy

AU - Sakzewski, Leanne

AU - Reedman, Sarah

AU - Hoffmann, Tammy

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Background Incomplete reporting of components of interventions limits uptake of evidence into clinical practice. Aims To evaluate the completeness of reporting of research and control interventions in randomised trials of upper limb therapies for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Methods and procedures Sixty randomized trials were included, encompassing 60 research and 68 control interventions. Using the 12-item Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist, two reviewers independently rated intervention and control descriptions. Outcomes and results When using 50% of studies as the benchmark, five of the 12 TIDieR items for the research intervention, eight of the 12 items for the control intervention and 11 of 12 items for “usual care” interventions were inadequately reported. Procedures used to deliver the research intervention were adequately reported for 63% of studies. Materials were used in 94% of research interventions, yet only 27% provided details to access/replicate materials. Training materials for interventionists were used in 38% of trials, 10 (17%) had procedure manuals, yet only 3 reported details to access materials. The location where the research intervention was provided was detailed in 65% of studies. Reporting of all items was poorer for the control intervention. Conclusions No study adequately reported all elements on the TIDieR checklist. Details crucial for replication of interventions and interpretation of results were missing. Authors, reviewers, and editors all have a responsibility to improve the quality of intervention reporting in published trials. The TIDieR guide is a potential solution, helping to structure accounts of interventions.

AB - Background Incomplete reporting of components of interventions limits uptake of evidence into clinical practice. Aims To evaluate the completeness of reporting of research and control interventions in randomised trials of upper limb therapies for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Methods and procedures Sixty randomized trials were included, encompassing 60 research and 68 control interventions. Using the 12-item Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist, two reviewers independently rated intervention and control descriptions. Outcomes and results When using 50% of studies as the benchmark, five of the 12 TIDieR items for the research intervention, eight of the 12 items for the control intervention and 11 of 12 items for “usual care” interventions were inadequately reported. Procedures used to deliver the research intervention were adequately reported for 63% of studies. Materials were used in 94% of research interventions, yet only 27% provided details to access/replicate materials. Training materials for interventionists were used in 38% of trials, 10 (17%) had procedure manuals, yet only 3 reported details to access materials. The location where the research intervention was provided was detailed in 65% of studies. Reporting of all items was poorer for the control intervention. Conclusions No study adequately reported all elements on the TIDieR checklist. Details crucial for replication of interventions and interpretation of results were missing. Authors, reviewers, and editors all have a responsibility to improve the quality of intervention reporting in published trials. The TIDieR guide is a potential solution, helping to structure accounts of interventions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84991489090&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ridd.2016.09.018

DO - 10.1016/j.ridd.2016.09.018

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 417

EP - 427

JO - Applied Research in Mental Retardation

JF - Applied Research in Mental Retardation

SN - 0891-4222

ER -