Do smoking cues make you want to smoke? And is it your parents' fault?

Serena Thorpe, Richard E. Hicks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The human, financial, and social costs ofcigarette smoking are considerable, and need to be reducedsubstantially (c.£, the recently launched National TobaccoYouth Campaign). This study investigated responses tosmoking cues, and links to parental style.One aim of the current study was to confirmearlier findings that smoking cues evoke cravings insmokers. Continued confim~ation might then suggest thatminimising exposure to these cues would reduce cigaretteconsumption though that would involve further study. Asecond aim of the study was to examine whetherrecollected parenting styles affected smokers’ responses tosmoking cues. Parenting styles are known to influence theinitiation of smoking but no earlier research has examinedlinks between parenting styles and smoking cues.A sample of 29 smokers and 44 non-smokerscompleted both a researcher-designed questionnaireincluding a series of non-smoking and smoking cues, and aParental Authority Questimmaire. Smokers reported astronger desire to smoke in response to smoking cues thauto neutral cues, confirming results of previous knownresearch. However, no significant support for thehypotheses that parenting styles affected responses tosmoking cues was found. But limited sampling, andmethodological issues, may have impacted the findings.The answers to the two questions are: "Yes", and: "Notdemonstrated: the jury is still out". Farther research isneeded to help reduce the national health and personal cost
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 42nd annual conference
Subtitle of host publicationPsychology making an impact
EditorsKate Moore
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherThe Australian Psychological Society Ltd
Pages392-396
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9780909881337
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventAustralian Psychological Society's (APS) Annual Conference - Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 25 Sep 200729 Sep 2007
https://www.psychology.org.au/publications/conferences/

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Psychological Society's (APS) Annual Conference
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period25/09/0729/09/07
Internet address

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  • Cite this

    Thorpe, S., & Hicks, R. E. (2007). Do smoking cues make you want to smoke? And is it your parents' fault? In K. Moore (Ed.), Proceedings of 42nd annual conference: Psychology making an impact (pp. 392-396). The Australian Psychological Society Ltd .