Do SmartSite antireflux valves limit the flow rate of 0.9% normal saline through intravenous cannulas?

David Liu, Gerben Keijzers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine whether the placement of a SmartSite antireflux valve between a bag of fluid with line giving set and an intravenous cannula decreases the flow rate. Fluid flow rates were compared in paired experiments with and without an antireflux valve using a pressure infuser or allowing fluid to flow by gravity only for four different sizes of intravenous cannulas (20-14 G). Antireflux valves significantly decreased the fluid flow rates for all cannula sizes, irrespective of whether a pressure infuser was used. The decrease in the flow rate was most marked for larger cannulas [gravity only: 14 G: 52% (95% confidence interval (CI): 37-68), 16 G: 39% (95% CI: 34-43); pressure bag: 14 G: 74% (95% CI: 70-78), 16 G: 56% (95% CI: 54-57); all P<0.001]. Where maximum fluid flow rates are desirable, clinicians should consider not using an antireflux valve.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-5
Number of pages3
JournalEuropean Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

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Confidence Intervals
Gravitation
Pressure
Cannula
6'-N-methylsisomicin

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title = "Do SmartSite antireflux valves limit the flow rate of 0.9{\%} normal saline through intravenous cannulas?",
abstract = "The aim of the study was to determine whether the placement of a SmartSite antireflux valve between a bag of fluid with line giving set and an intravenous cannula decreases the flow rate. Fluid flow rates were compared in paired experiments with and without an antireflux valve using a pressure infuser or allowing fluid to flow by gravity only for four different sizes of intravenous cannulas (20-14 G). Antireflux valves significantly decreased the fluid flow rates for all cannula sizes, irrespective of whether a pressure infuser was used. The decrease in the flow rate was most marked for larger cannulas [gravity only: 14 G: 52{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 37-68), 16 G: 39{\%} (95{\%} CI: 34-43); pressure bag: 14 G: 74{\%} (95{\%} CI: 70-78), 16 G: 56{\%} (95{\%} CI: 54-57); all P<0.001]. Where maximum fluid flow rates are desirable, clinicians should consider not using an antireflux valve.",
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Do SmartSite antireflux valves limit the flow rate of 0.9% normal saline through intravenous cannulas? / Liu, David; Keijzers, Gerben.

In: European Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 2, 04.2013, p. 123-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Keijzers, Gerben

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AB - The aim of the study was to determine whether the placement of a SmartSite antireflux valve between a bag of fluid with line giving set and an intravenous cannula decreases the flow rate. Fluid flow rates were compared in paired experiments with and without an antireflux valve using a pressure infuser or allowing fluid to flow by gravity only for four different sizes of intravenous cannulas (20-14 G). Antireflux valves significantly decreased the fluid flow rates for all cannula sizes, irrespective of whether a pressure infuser was used. The decrease in the flow rate was most marked for larger cannulas [gravity only: 14 G: 52% (95% confidence interval (CI): 37-68), 16 G: 39% (95% CI: 34-43); pressure bag: 14 G: 74% (95% CI: 70-78), 16 G: 56% (95% CI: 54-57); all P<0.001]. Where maximum fluid flow rates are desirable, clinicians should consider not using an antireflux valve.

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