Diffuse solar UV radiation and implications for preventing human eye damage

Alfio V. Parisi*, Adele Green, Michael O. Kimlin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ocular UV exposure is a function of both the direct and diffuse components of solar radiation. Broadband global and diffuse UV measurements were made in the morning, noon and afternoon. Thirty sets of measurements were made in summer and 50 in each of the other seasons at each of the periods in full sun. Corresponding sets were made in the shade of Australian evergreen trees: 42 trees in summer and 50 in each of the other seasons. The percentage diffuse UV was higher for the shorter 320-400 nm range (UVB) than for 280-320 nm (UVA). The percentage diffuse UVB ranged from 23 to 59%, whereas the percentage diffuse UVA ranged from 17 to 31%. The percentage diffuse UV was lower at noon than in the morning and afternoon with the difference more pronounced for the UVB. The average percentage diffuse UVB over all the measurements in the tree shade for the morning, noon and afternoon was 62, 58 and 71%, respectively, and the average percentage diffuse UVA was 52, 51 and 59%, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-139
Number of pages5
JournalPhotochemistry and Photobiology
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2001
Externally publishedYes

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