Differences in heart rates between general officers and instructors employing defensive tactics skills

Rob Marc Orr, Christopher Pearson, Ben Schram, Robert G. Lockie, Ryan Holmes, Charlie Kornhauser, Jay Dawes

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To compare heart rate responses during a defensive tactics skills between expert and general duties police officers.
Design: Retrospective cohort study.
Method: Heart rate (HR) data (mean, peak, and peak HR percentage, measured by Polar FT7) of police officers completing a defensive tactics (DEFTAC) gauntlet were provided. Participants were: 24 police instructors (age = 32.13±6.72yrs, height = 178.30±60cm, body mass = 92.40±16.30kg) and 37 general duties
officers (age = 39.20±8.40 years, height = 179.50±7.70cm, body mass = 89.70±14.1kg). Independent samples t-tests (instructors and officers) and an ANOVA (instructors, officers who passed, officers who failed) were
performed.
Results: There were no significant differences in HR measures between the instructors (HR: mean =154.50±21.27bpm; peak = 179.50±13.81bpm, peak% = 96.70±5.16%) and the general duties police officers (Passed n=23, HR: mean = 155.82±18.77bpm; peak = 180.30±8.88bpm, peak% = 98.57±7.28%: Failed n = 11, HR: mean = 160.81±14 .02bpm; peak = 177.00±11.58bpm, peak% = 99.82±5.74%) the DEFTAC drill. Nonetheless, the officers who failed DEFTAC worked at the highest percentage of peak HR.
Conclusion: All participants, regardless of skill, exhibited a maximal HR response when engaged in defensive tactics skills. With cardiovascular disease risk being higher in police officers than the general population, maintaining heart health is of importance to all officers, regardless of their time in service.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 17 Oct 2019
EventTRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference - Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 17 Oct 201919 Oct 2019
https://transform.physio/
https://transform.physio/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Abstract_Book_Adelaide_2019.pdf (Abstracts)
https://transform.physio/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/APA_2019_POCKET_PROGRAM_A5_2.pdf%22 (Full Program)

Conference

ConferenceTRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period17/10/1919/10/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Heart Rate
Police
Body Height
Mandrillus
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Retrospective Studies
Health
Population

Cite this

Orr, R. M., Pearson, C., Schram, B., Lockie, R. G., Holmes, R., Kornhauser, C., & Dawes, J. (2019). Differences in heart rates between general officers and instructors employing defensive tactics skills. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
Orr, Rob Marc ; Pearson, Christopher ; Schram, Ben ; Lockie, Robert G. ; Holmes, Ryan ; Kornhauser, Charlie ; Dawes, Jay. / Differences in heart rates between general officers and instructors employing defensive tactics skills. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
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Orr, RM, Pearson, C, Schram, B, Lockie, RG, Holmes, R, Kornhauser, C & Dawes, J 2019, 'Differences in heart rates between general officers and instructors employing defensive tactics skills' TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia, 17/10/19 - 19/10/19, .

Differences in heart rates between general officers and instructors employing defensive tactics skills. / Orr, Rob Marc; Pearson, Christopher; Schram, Ben; Lockie, Robert G.; Holmes, Ryan; Kornhauser, Charlie; Dawes, Jay.

2019. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Differences in heart rates between general officers and instructors employing defensive tactics skills

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Pearson, Christopher

AU - Schram, Ben

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

AU - Holmes, Ryan

AU - Kornhauser, Charlie

AU - Dawes, Jay

PY - 2019/10/17

Y1 - 2019/10/17

N2 - Aim: To compare heart rate responses during a defensive tactics skills between expert and general duties police officers.Design: Retrospective cohort study.Method: Heart rate (HR) data (mean, peak, and peak HR percentage, measured by Polar FT7) of police officers completing a defensive tactics (DEFTAC) gauntlet were provided. Participants were: 24 police instructors (age = 32.13±6.72yrs, height = 178.30±60cm, body mass = 92.40±16.30kg) and 37 general dutiesofficers (age = 39.20±8.40 years, height = 179.50±7.70cm, body mass = 89.70±14.1kg). Independent samples t-tests (instructors and officers) and an ANOVA (instructors, officers who passed, officers who failed) wereperformed.Results: There were no significant differences in HR measures between the instructors (HR: mean =154.50±21.27bpm; peak = 179.50±13.81bpm, peak% = 96.70±5.16%) and the general duties police officers (Passed n=23, HR: mean = 155.82±18.77bpm; peak = 180.30±8.88bpm, peak% = 98.57±7.28%: Failed n = 11, HR: mean = 160.81±14 .02bpm; peak = 177.00±11.58bpm, peak% = 99.82±5.74%) the DEFTAC drill. Nonetheless, the officers who failed DEFTAC worked at the highest percentage of peak HR.Conclusion: All participants, regardless of skill, exhibited a maximal HR response when engaged in defensive tactics skills. With cardiovascular disease risk being higher in police officers than the general population, maintaining heart health is of importance to all officers, regardless of their time in service.

AB - Aim: To compare heart rate responses during a defensive tactics skills between expert and general duties police officers.Design: Retrospective cohort study.Method: Heart rate (HR) data (mean, peak, and peak HR percentage, measured by Polar FT7) of police officers completing a defensive tactics (DEFTAC) gauntlet were provided. Participants were: 24 police instructors (age = 32.13±6.72yrs, height = 178.30±60cm, body mass = 92.40±16.30kg) and 37 general dutiesofficers (age = 39.20±8.40 years, height = 179.50±7.70cm, body mass = 89.70±14.1kg). Independent samples t-tests (instructors and officers) and an ANOVA (instructors, officers who passed, officers who failed) wereperformed.Results: There were no significant differences in HR measures between the instructors (HR: mean =154.50±21.27bpm; peak = 179.50±13.81bpm, peak% = 96.70±5.16%) and the general duties police officers (Passed n=23, HR: mean = 155.82±18.77bpm; peak = 180.30±8.88bpm, peak% = 98.57±7.28%: Failed n = 11, HR: mean = 160.81±14 .02bpm; peak = 177.00±11.58bpm, peak% = 99.82±5.74%) the DEFTAC drill. Nonetheless, the officers who failed DEFTAC worked at the highest percentage of peak HR.Conclusion: All participants, regardless of skill, exhibited a maximal HR response when engaged in defensive tactics skills. With cardiovascular disease risk being higher in police officers than the general population, maintaining heart health is of importance to all officers, regardless of their time in service.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Orr RM, Pearson C, Schram B, Lockie RG, Holmes R, Kornhauser C et al. Differences in heart rates between general officers and instructors employing defensive tactics skills. 2019. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.