Dietary protein, weight loss, and weight maintenance

M. S. Westerterp-Plantenga, A. Nieuwenhuizen, D. Tomé, S. Soenen, K. R. Westerterp

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

282 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of dietary protein in weight loss and weight maintenance encompasses influences on crucial targets for body weight regulation, namely satiety, thermogenesis, energy efficiency, and body composition. Protein-induced satiety may be mainly due to oxidation of amino acids fed in excess, especially in diets with "incomplete" proteins. Proteininduced energy expenditure may be due to protein and urea synthesis and to gluconeogenesis; "complete" proteins having all essential amino acids show larger increases in energy expenditure than do lower-quality proteins. With respect to adverse effects, no protein-induced effects are observed on net bone balance or on calcium balance in young adults and elderly persons. Dietary protein even increases bone mineral mass and reduces incidence of osteoporotic fracture. During weight loss, nitrogen intake positively affects calcium balance and consequent preservation of bone mineral content. Sulphur-containing amino acids cause a blood pressure-raising effect by loss of nephron mass. Subjects with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes are particularly susceptible groups. This review provides an overview of how sustaining absolute protein intake affects metabolic targets for weight loss and weight maintenance during negative energy balance, i.e., sustaining satiety and energy expenditure and sparing fat-free mass, resulting in energy inefficiency. However, the long-term relationship between net protein synthesis and sparing fat-free mass remains to be elucidated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-41
Number of pages21
JournalAnnual Review of Nutrition
Volume29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Dietary Proteins
Weight Loss
Maintenance
Weights and Measures
Proteins
Energy Metabolism
Fats
Calcium
Sulfur Amino Acids
Bone and Bones
Osteoporotic Fractures
Essential Amino Acids
Gluconeogenesis
Thermogenesis
Nephrons
Body Composition
Bone Density
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Minerals
Urea

Cite this

Westerterp-Plantenga, M. S., Nieuwenhuizen, A., Tomé, D., Soenen, S., & Westerterp, K. R. (2009). Dietary protein, weight loss, and weight maintenance. Annual Review of Nutrition, 29, 21-41. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-nutr-080508-141056
Westerterp-Plantenga, M. S. ; Nieuwenhuizen, A. ; Tomé, D. ; Soenen, S. ; Westerterp, K. R. / Dietary protein, weight loss, and weight maintenance. In: Annual Review of Nutrition. 2009 ; Vol. 29. pp. 21-41.
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Westerterp-Plantenga, MS, Nieuwenhuizen, A, Tomé, D, Soenen, S & Westerterp, KR 2009, 'Dietary protein, weight loss, and weight maintenance' Annual Review of Nutrition, vol. 29, pp. 21-41. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-nutr-080508-141056

Dietary protein, weight loss, and weight maintenance. / Westerterp-Plantenga, M. S.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.; Tomé, D.; Soenen, S.; Westerterp, K. R.

In: Annual Review of Nutrition, Vol. 29, 01.08.2009, p. 21-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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