Dexamphetamine enhances explicit new word learning for novel objects

Emma Whiting, Helen Chenery, Jonathan Chalk, Ross Darnell, David A. Copland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Past research suggests that dexamphetamine (Dex) can facilitate learning and memory in healthy individuals and after a neurological lesion. This study investigated the effects of Dex on the learning of names for new objects in young healthy adults (n=37) within an explicit learning paradigm by using a double-blind, placebo-controlled between- subjects design. Participants received 10 mg Dex or a placebo each morning over five consecutive days before viewing 100 novel objects with non-word names plus matched fillers. Compared to the placebo, Dex enhanced both the rate of learning and the retention of the words 1 wk and 1 month later. The improved word learning correlated with baseline attention and memory scores for participants in the Dex group only. No correlations were observed between word-learning success and sustained attention, mood or cardiovascular arousal. It was concluded that the improved explicit word learning may have reflected dexamphetamine-induced changes in short-term memory and/or memory consolidation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)805-816
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Dextroamphetamine
Learning
Placebos
Names
Arousal
Short-Term Memory
Young Adult
Research

Cite this

Whiting, Emma ; Chenery, Helen ; Chalk, Jonathan ; Darnell, Ross ; Copland, David A. / Dexamphetamine enhances explicit new word learning for novel objects. In: International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology. 2007 ; Vol. 10, No. 6. pp. 805-816.
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Dexamphetamine enhances explicit new word learning for novel objects. / Whiting, Emma; Chenery, Helen; Chalk, Jonathan; Darnell, Ross; Copland, David A.

In: International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 10, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 805-816.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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