Detection of malingering: A survey of Australian psychologists' current practices

Jacqueline Yoxall, Mark Bahr, Norman Barling

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To explore Australian psychologists’beliefs & practices in the detection of malingering& to establish a retrospective estimation of malingering prevalence. Method: One hundred psychologists (in psycho-legal practice) completed a survey adapted from Slick et al. (2003). Statistical analysis included non-parametric tests & discriminant function analysis. Results: Respondents retrospectively estimated a 10% prevalence of malingering in psycho-legal arena, but differed in endorsment of explanatory models. Conclusion:Estimation of malingering prevalence in Australia appears similar to that derived from North American studies. There is indication that exposure to psycho-legal assessments, beliefs about malingering,and use of detection strategies may predict psychologists’ retrospective estimation of malingering prevalence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-303
Number of pages1
JournalInternational Journal of Psychology
Volume43
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Cite this

@article{266ed844f2144ea6820643bb25989836,
title = "Detection of malingering: A survey of Australian psychologists' current practices",
abstract = "Objective: To explore Australian psychologists’beliefs & practices in the detection of malingering& to establish a retrospective estimation of malingering prevalence. Method: One hundred psychologists (in psycho-legal practice) completed a survey adapted from Slick et al. (2003). Statistical analysis included non-parametric tests & discriminant function analysis. Results: Respondents retrospectively estimated a 10{\%} prevalence of malingering in psycho-legal arena, but differed in endorsment of explanatory models. Conclusion:Estimation of malingering prevalence in Australia appears similar to that derived from North American studies. There is indication that exposure to psycho-legal assessments, beliefs about malingering,and use of detection strategies may predict psychologists’ retrospective estimation of malingering prevalence.",
author = "Jacqueline Yoxall and Mark Bahr and Norman Barling",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1080/00207594.2008.10108484",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "303--303",
journal = "International Journal of Psychology",
issn = "0020-7594",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "3-4",

}

Detection of malingering : A survey of Australian psychologists' current practices. / Yoxall, Jacqueline; Bahr, Mark; Barling, Norman.

In: International Journal of Psychology, Vol. 43, No. 3-4, 2008, p. 303-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Detection of malingering

T2 - A survey of Australian psychologists' current practices

AU - Yoxall, Jacqueline

AU - Bahr, Mark

AU - Barling, Norman

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Objective: To explore Australian psychologists’beliefs & practices in the detection of malingering& to establish a retrospective estimation of malingering prevalence. Method: One hundred psychologists (in psycho-legal practice) completed a survey adapted from Slick et al. (2003). Statistical analysis included non-parametric tests & discriminant function analysis. Results: Respondents retrospectively estimated a 10% prevalence of malingering in psycho-legal arena, but differed in endorsment of explanatory models. Conclusion:Estimation of malingering prevalence in Australia appears similar to that derived from North American studies. There is indication that exposure to psycho-legal assessments, beliefs about malingering,and use of detection strategies may predict psychologists’ retrospective estimation of malingering prevalence.

AB - Objective: To explore Australian psychologists’beliefs & practices in the detection of malingering& to establish a retrospective estimation of malingering prevalence. Method: One hundred psychologists (in psycho-legal practice) completed a survey adapted from Slick et al. (2003). Statistical analysis included non-parametric tests & discriminant function analysis. Results: Respondents retrospectively estimated a 10% prevalence of malingering in psycho-legal arena, but differed in endorsment of explanatory models. Conclusion:Estimation of malingering prevalence in Australia appears similar to that derived from North American studies. There is indication that exposure to psycho-legal assessments, beliefs about malingering,and use of detection strategies may predict psychologists’ retrospective estimation of malingering prevalence.

U2 - 10.1080/00207594.2008.10108484

DO - 10.1080/00207594.2008.10108484

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 43

SP - 303

EP - 303

JO - International Journal of Psychology

JF - International Journal of Psychology

SN - 0020-7594

IS - 3-4

ER -