Designing for future building: Adaptive reuse as a strategy for carbon neutral cities

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Abstract

Adapting existing buildings is a viable alternative to demolition and replacement in order to mitigate climate change and global warming. Australian cities with inherent cultural heritage fabric, like Melbourne and Sydney, are actively promoting building adaptive reuse as a strategy that supports their programme for developing carbon-neutral cities. Thus, designing for future buildings with embedded adaptive reuse potential is a useful criterion for sustainability. Building adaptive reuse entails less energy and waste, protects the buildings’ heritage values- its socio-cultural and historic meanings; while giving them a new lease of life. This paper looks into urban conservation-- an interdisciplinary field that combines adaptive reuse, architecture and community development of the built heritage. It will further introduce the development of a new rating tool known as adaptSTAR, suitable for assessing the adaptive reuse potential of future buildings to lead and help promote the development of low to no carbon built environments.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-52
Number of pages20
JournalThe International Journal of Climate Change: Impacts and Responses
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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demolition
cultural heritage
carbon
community development
global warming
replacement
sustainability
climate change
energy
city
fabric
lease
programme
built environment

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title = "Designing for future building: Adaptive reuse as a strategy for carbon neutral cities",
abstract = "Adapting existing buildings is a viable alternative to demolition and replacement in order to mitigate climate change and global warming. Australian cities with inherent cultural heritage fabric, like Melbourne and Sydney, are actively promoting building adaptive reuse as a strategy that supports their programme for developing carbon-neutral cities. Thus, designing for future buildings with embedded adaptive reuse potential is a useful criterion for sustainability. Building adaptive reuse entails less energy and waste, protects the buildings’ heritage values- its socio-cultural and historic meanings; while giving them a new lease of life. This paper looks into urban conservation-- an interdisciplinary field that combines adaptive reuse, architecture and community development of the built heritage. It will further introduce the development of a new rating tool known as adaptSTAR, suitable for assessing the adaptive reuse potential of future buildings to lead and help promote the development of low to no carbon built environments.",
author = "Sheila Conejos and Langston, {Craig Ashley} and Jim Smith",
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}

Designing for future building : Adaptive reuse as a strategy for carbon neutral cities. / Conejos, Sheila; Langston, Craig Ashley; Smith, Jim .

In: The International Journal of Climate Change: Impacts and Responses, Vol. 3, No. 2, 2012, p. 33-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T2 - Adaptive reuse as a strategy for carbon neutral cities

AU - Conejos, Sheila

AU - Langston, Craig Ashley

AU - Smith, Jim

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