Dance mobility: A somatic and dance programme for older adults in New Zealand

Felicity Molloy, Justin Keogh, Jean Krampe, Azucena Guzmán

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article describes the significance of Dance Mobility™, a new community dance programme that follows a New Zealand partnership research project, designed for older adults with diverse motor skill levels and dance experiences. The programme includes high-functioning older adults, some with sensory or balance impairments and others with Parkinson's disease. We discuss the benefits and challenges of facilitating a once-weekly dance practice model and the ways the programme affects individuals sensorial states of well-being and awareness. Somatic practices are introduced as integral to Dance Mobility™ teaching methods and dance activities. We include observations and comparisons with dance embodiment theories, cross-disciplinary goals of gerontology and exercise science/rehabilitation research to debate benefits and limitations of dance for older adults, and adaptive methods of the Dance Mobility™ approach. Somatic research is needed to build evidence-based conclusions that advance older adults feelings of well-being and safeguard their motivations to continue moving freely.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-180
Number of pages12
JournalBody, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jul 2015

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New Zealand
Motor Skills
Research
Geriatrics
Parkinson Disease
Motivation
Teaching
Emotions
Rehabilitation Research

Cite this

Molloy, Felicity ; Keogh, Justin ; Krampe, Jean ; Guzmán, Azucena. / Dance mobility : A somatic and dance programme for older adults in New Zealand. In: Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 169-180.
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Dance mobility : A somatic and dance programme for older adults in New Zealand. / Molloy, Felicity; Keogh, Justin; Krampe, Jean; Guzmán, Azucena.

In: Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy, Vol. 10, No. 3, 03.07.2015, p. 169-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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