Criminalising conversations: Australia’s damaging love affair with consorting laws

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceResearch

Abstract

[Extract]
Australia is known as a desirable place to live. It has the freedoms most associate with a Western democracy. But Australian state and territory governments are moving toward criminal association or consorting laws as a means of crime management, particularly in relation to organised crime.

Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia have introduced these restrictive laws. But are the laws justified? Are they an efficient and effective way to combat organised crime?
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 8 Feb 2016

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love
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organized crime
Law
offense
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management

Cite this

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Criminalising conversations : Australia’s damaging love affair with consorting laws. / Goldsworthy, Terrence.

In: The Conversation, 08.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceResearch

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