Controversies in the science of sedentary behaviour and health: Insights, perspectives and future directions from the 2018 queensland sedentary behaviour think tank

Stuart J.H. Biddle*, Jason A. Bennie, Katrien De Cocker, David Dunstan, Paul A. Gardiner, Genevieve N. Healy, Brigid Lynch, Neville Owen, Charlotte Brakenridge, Wendy Brown, Matthew Buman, Bronwyn Clark, Ing Mari Dohrn, Mitch Duncan, Nicholas Gilson, Tracy Kolbe-Alexander, Toby Pavey, Natasha Reid, Corneel Vandelanotte, Ineke VergeerGrace E. Vincent

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development in research concerning sedentary behaviour has been rapid over the past two decades. This has led to the development of evidence and views that have become more advanced, diverse and, possibly, contentious. These include the effects of standing, the breaking up of prolonged sitting and the role of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in the association between sedentary behaviour and health outcomes. The present aim is to report the views of experts (n = 21) brought together (one-day face-to-face meeting in 2018) to consider these issues and provide conclusions and recommendations for future work. Each topic was reviewed and presented by one expert followed by full group discussion, which was recorded, transcribed and analysed. The experts concluded that (a). standing may bring benefits that accrue from postural shifts. Prolonged (mainly static) standing and prolonged sitting are both bad for health; (b). ‘the best posture is the next posture’. Regularly breaking up of sitting with postural shifts and movement is vital; (c). health effects of prolonged sitting are evident even after controlling for MVPA, but high levels of MVPA can attenuate the deleterious effects of prolonged sitting depending on the health outcome of interest. Expert discussion addressed measurement, messaging and future directions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4762
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Nov 2019
Externally publishedYes

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