Conservative Interventions for Non-Specific Low Back Pain in Tactical Populations: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

Eduardo Marins, Eduardo Caputo, Marcelo da Silva, Jay Dawes, Rob Marc Orr, Christine Lima Alberton

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Abstract

Limited evidence exists about non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) interventions among tactical personnel (police officers, firefighters, or army forces). The aim was to identify and systematically review the findings of randomized control trials (RCTs) investigating conservative interventions for the treatment NSLBP in tactical personnel. A search of seven databases for randomized controlled trials RCTs were conducted. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed the risk of bias (PEDro scale). Five RCTs (n = 387 military subjects; median PEDro score = 7/10) were included. The trials were highly heterogeneous, differing in pain and disability outcome measures, duration of NSLBP symptoms (acute, nonacute, nonchronic, and chronic), types of intervention (exercise, manual therapy, and physical therapy), types of control groups, and intervention durations (4–12 weeks). Two studies reported that strengthening exercise interventions were not effective for reducing pain or disability in military personnel with chronic or nonacute NSLBP. Manual therapy treatment was more effective than usual activities in current pain and pain typical symptoms in soldiers with acute NSLBP after four weeks. A multidimensional intervention reduced disability in military personnel with non-chronic NSLBP after four weeks. Strong evidence does not exist for the efficacy of any conservative interventions in the reduction of pain and disability in tactical populations with NSLBP.
Original languageEnglish
Article number7922
Number of pages22
JournalSafety
Volume12
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Sep 2020

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