Compliance with dietary guidelines affects capillary recruitment in healthy middle-aged men and women

Virginia Govoni, Thomas A B Sanders, Dianne P Reidlinger, Julia Darzi, Sarah E E Berry, Louise M Goff, Paul T Seed, Philip J Chowienczyk, Wendy L Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Healthy microcirculation is important to maintain the health of tissues and organs, most notably the heart, kidney and retina. Single components of the diet such as salt, lipids and polyphenols may influence microcirculation, but the effects of dietary patterns that are consistent with current dietary guidelines are uncertain. It was hypothesized that compliance to UK dietary guidelines would have a favourable effect on skin capillary density/recruitment compared with a traditional British diet (control diet).

METHODS: A 12-week randomized controlled trial in men and women aged 40-70 years was used to test whether skin microcirculation, measured by skin video-capillaroscopy on the dorsum of the finger, influenced functional capillary density (number of capillaries perfused under basal conditions), structural capillary density (number of anatomical capillaries perfused during finger cuff inflation) and capillary recruitment (percentage difference between structural and functional capillary density).

RESULTS: Microvascular measures were available for 137 subjects out of the 165 participants randomized to treatment. There was evidence of compliance to the dietary intervention, and participants randomized to follow dietary guidelines showed significant falls in resting supine systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure of 3.5, 2.6 and 2.9 mmHg compared to the control diet. There was no evidence of differences in capillary density, but capillary recruitment was 3.5 % (95 % CI 0.2, 6.9) greater (P = 0.04) on dietary guidelines compared with control.

CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to dietary guidelines may help maintain a healthy microcirculation in middle-aged men and women. This study is registered at www.isrctn.com as ISRCTN92382106.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1037-1044
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
Volume56
Issue number3
Early online date8 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nutrition Policy
Microcirculation
Diet
Fingers
Microscopic Angioscopy
Skin
compound A 12
Economic Inflation
Polyphenols
Skin Tests
Retina
Arterial Pressure
Randomized Controlled Trials
Salts
Kidney
Lipids

Cite this

Govoni, Virginia ; Sanders, Thomas A B ; Reidlinger, Dianne P ; Darzi, Julia ; Berry, Sarah E E ; Goff, Louise M ; Seed, Paul T ; Chowienczyk, Philip J ; Hall, Wendy L. / Compliance with dietary guidelines affects capillary recruitment in healthy middle-aged men and women. In: European Journal of Nutrition. 2017 ; Vol. 56, No. 3. pp. 1037-1044.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: Healthy microcirculation is important to maintain the health of tissues and organs, most notably the heart, kidney and retina. Single components of the diet such as salt, lipids and polyphenols may influence microcirculation, but the effects of dietary patterns that are consistent with current dietary guidelines are uncertain. It was hypothesized that compliance to UK dietary guidelines would have a favourable effect on skin capillary density/recruitment compared with a traditional British diet (control diet).METHODS: A 12-week randomized controlled trial in men and women aged 40-70 years was used to test whether skin microcirculation, measured by skin video-capillaroscopy on the dorsum of the finger, influenced functional capillary density (number of capillaries perfused under basal conditions), structural capillary density (number of anatomical capillaries perfused during finger cuff inflation) and capillary recruitment (percentage difference between structural and functional capillary density).RESULTS: Microvascular measures were available for 137 subjects out of the 165 participants randomized to treatment. There was evidence of compliance to the dietary intervention, and participants randomized to follow dietary guidelines showed significant falls in resting supine systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure of 3.5, 2.6 and 2.9 mmHg compared to the control diet. There was no evidence of differences in capillary density, but capillary recruitment was 3.5 {\%} (95 {\%} CI 0.2, 6.9) greater (P = 0.04) on dietary guidelines compared with control.CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to dietary guidelines may help maintain a healthy microcirculation in middle-aged men and women. This study is registered at www.isrctn.com as ISRCTN92382106.",
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Govoni, V, Sanders, TAB, Reidlinger, DP, Darzi, J, Berry, SEE, Goff, LM, Seed, PT, Chowienczyk, PJ & Hall, WL 2017, 'Compliance with dietary guidelines affects capillary recruitment in healthy middle-aged men and women' European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 56, no. 3, pp. 1037-1044. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-015-1151-3

Compliance with dietary guidelines affects capillary recruitment in healthy middle-aged men and women. / Govoni, Virginia; Sanders, Thomas A B; Reidlinger, Dianne P; Darzi, Julia; Berry, Sarah E E; Goff, Louise M; Seed, Paul T; Chowienczyk, Philip J; Hall, Wendy L.

In: European Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 56, No. 3, 01.04.2017, p. 1037-1044.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Compliance with dietary guidelines affects capillary recruitment in healthy middle-aged men and women

AU - Govoni, Virginia

AU - Sanders, Thomas A B

AU - Reidlinger, Dianne P

AU - Darzi, Julia

AU - Berry, Sarah E E

AU - Goff, Louise M

AU - Seed, Paul T

AU - Chowienczyk, Philip J

AU - Hall, Wendy L

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - PURPOSE: Healthy microcirculation is important to maintain the health of tissues and organs, most notably the heart, kidney and retina. Single components of the diet such as salt, lipids and polyphenols may influence microcirculation, but the effects of dietary patterns that are consistent with current dietary guidelines are uncertain. It was hypothesized that compliance to UK dietary guidelines would have a favourable effect on skin capillary density/recruitment compared with a traditional British diet (control diet).METHODS: A 12-week randomized controlled trial in men and women aged 40-70 years was used to test whether skin microcirculation, measured by skin video-capillaroscopy on the dorsum of the finger, influenced functional capillary density (number of capillaries perfused under basal conditions), structural capillary density (number of anatomical capillaries perfused during finger cuff inflation) and capillary recruitment (percentage difference between structural and functional capillary density).RESULTS: Microvascular measures were available for 137 subjects out of the 165 participants randomized to treatment. There was evidence of compliance to the dietary intervention, and participants randomized to follow dietary guidelines showed significant falls in resting supine systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure of 3.5, 2.6 and 2.9 mmHg compared to the control diet. There was no evidence of differences in capillary density, but capillary recruitment was 3.5 % (95 % CI 0.2, 6.9) greater (P = 0.04) on dietary guidelines compared with control.CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to dietary guidelines may help maintain a healthy microcirculation in middle-aged men and women. This study is registered at www.isrctn.com as ISRCTN92382106.

AB - PURPOSE: Healthy microcirculation is important to maintain the health of tissues and organs, most notably the heart, kidney and retina. Single components of the diet such as salt, lipids and polyphenols may influence microcirculation, but the effects of dietary patterns that are consistent with current dietary guidelines are uncertain. It was hypothesized that compliance to UK dietary guidelines would have a favourable effect on skin capillary density/recruitment compared with a traditional British diet (control diet).METHODS: A 12-week randomized controlled trial in men and women aged 40-70 years was used to test whether skin microcirculation, measured by skin video-capillaroscopy on the dorsum of the finger, influenced functional capillary density (number of capillaries perfused under basal conditions), structural capillary density (number of anatomical capillaries perfused during finger cuff inflation) and capillary recruitment (percentage difference between structural and functional capillary density).RESULTS: Microvascular measures were available for 137 subjects out of the 165 participants randomized to treatment. There was evidence of compliance to the dietary intervention, and participants randomized to follow dietary guidelines showed significant falls in resting supine systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure of 3.5, 2.6 and 2.9 mmHg compared to the control diet. There was no evidence of differences in capillary density, but capillary recruitment was 3.5 % (95 % CI 0.2, 6.9) greater (P = 0.04) on dietary guidelines compared with control.CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to dietary guidelines may help maintain a healthy microcirculation in middle-aged men and women. This study is registered at www.isrctn.com as ISRCTN92382106.

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