Cohort profile: The hunter community study

Mark McEvoy*, Wayne Smith, Catherine D'Este, Janine Duke, Roseanne Peel, Peter Schofield, Rodney J. Scott, Julie Byles, David Henry, Ben Ewald, Stephen Hancock, Derek Smith, John R. Attia

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

[Extract} In almost every country, the proportion of people aged >60 years is growing faster than any other age group and is expected to reach 2 billion worldwide by 2050. Internationally and nationally, considerable efforts are being made to promote active ageing.However, Australia lacks the kind of comprehensive longitudinal research underway in Europe and North America. Although Australia does have a number of longitudinal studies designed to address various issues of health and ageing among older adults,only a few of these studies include a broad and comprehensive range of physical and biological measures. The Hunter Community Study (HCS) is a collaborative study between the University of Newcastle’s School of Medicine and Public Health and the Hunter New England Area Health Service. It is a multi disciplinary initiative that was established to fill some existing gaps in ageing research in Australia and is unique in that it has collected detailed information across all six key policy themes as identified in the Framework for an Australian Ageing Research Agenda.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberdyp343
Pages (from-to)1452-1463
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cohort profile: The hunter community study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    McEvoy, M., Smith, W., D'Este, C., Duke, J., Peel, R., Schofield, P., Scott, R. J., Byles, J., Henry, D., Ewald, B., Hancock, S., Smith, D., & Attia, J. R. (2010). Cohort profile: The hunter community study. International Journal of Epidemiology, 39(6), 1452-1463. [dyp343]. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyp343